Wednesday, December 31, 2008

Betray the Night

Betray the Night: A Novel About Ovid
by Benita Kane Jaro



The poet of love, the wanton princess, the most powerful man
the world has ever seen: a clash of wills and story of love....

In the year 8 AD, at the age of fifty, the most famous poet in Rome, Publius Ovidius Naso, known to us as Ovid, is suddenly exiled by the Emperor Augustus for an unknown reason. His young and beautiful wife Pinaria stays behind to try to salvage something of their lives and to work to bring him home. A woman alone, she is handicapped by the powerlessness of her position. It is not until she leaves behind the world of men to search among the people Rome has forgotten: the women, the slaves, the runaways and temple prostitutes, that she begins to understand what has happened to her life and her husband’s, and what the world around her really is.

Historically accurate, deeply researched, and poetically written, Betray the Night is a sympathetic reading of the position of women, and a study of the terror of power. Exciting and fast moving, it may be read on its own or as a companion to Benita Kane Jaro’s trilogy The Key, The Lock, and The Door in the Wall.

Cover art by Thom Kapheim.

260pp. (2009) Paperback, ISBN 978-0-86516-712-4

Click here to see Betray the Night at our website.

Tuesday, December 30, 2008

Now available on CD

Latin Music Through the Ages



Now available on CD.

Track list:
1. Virgin's Cradle Hymn
2. Song of the Nuns of Chester
3. Orientis Partibus
4. Mirabile Mysterium
5. O Admirabile Commercium
6. Ave Regina Coelorum
7. Ave Generosa
8. Hodie Christus Natus Est
9. Ubi Caritas
10. Ave Verum
11. Dulcis Amica
12. Non Nobis, Domine
13. O Sacrum Convivium
14. Diversos Diversa Iuvant
15. Amo, amas
16. Poculum Elevatum
17. O Vos Omnes

Friday, December 26, 2008

a.d. VII Kal. Iun.

De minimis non curat lex.
–Legal

Thursday, December 25, 2008

Felicem Christi Natalem!

Merry Christmas!

Here's a sampling of our Christmas titles.


How the Grinch Stole Christmas in Latin
by Dr. Seuss
translated by Terence O. Tunberg and Jennifer Morrish Tunberg


Yes, Virginia, There Is a Santa Claus...In Latin!
by Francis Pharcellus Church
translated by Walter Sauer and Hermann Wiegand
illustrated by Matthias Kringe


O Abies
by Teddy Irwin and C. C. Couch

Other gift suggestions here.
Check page for exact details of offer.

Wednesday, December 24, 2008

a.d. IX Kal. Ian.

Labor omnia vincit.
–Vergil

Locus: Georgics 1.145

Tuesday, December 23, 2008

a.d. X Kal. Ian.

Vulgus ex veritate pauca, ex opinione multa aestimat.
–M. Tullius Cicero

Locus: Pro Roscio Comodeo 29

Friday, December 19, 2008

a.d. XIV Kal. Ian.

Ningat, ningat, ningat!
–Franciscus Sinatra

Thursday, December 18, 2008

a.d. XV Kal. Ian.

Bonos corrumpunt mores congressus mali.
–Tertullian

Wednesday, December 17, 2008

a.d. XVI Kal Ian.

Io Saturnalia!

Saturnalia begins today.

Tuesday, December 16, 2008

a.d. XVII Kal. Ian.

Unguibus et rostro.
–Anonymous

Friday, December 12, 2008

pridie Id. Dec.

Artes, scientia, veritas.
–Motto of the University of Michigan

Thursday, December 11, 2008

a.d. III Id. Dec.

In pace leones, in proelio cervi.
–Tertullian

Wednesday, December 10, 2008

a.d. IV Id. Dec.

Abusus non tollit usus.
–Legal

Tuesday, December 09, 2008

a.d. V Id. Dec.

Ius superat vires.
–Anonymous

Friday, December 05, 2008

Horace: A LEGAMUS Transitional Reader

Horace: A LEGAMUS Transitional Reader
by Ronnie Ancona & David J. Murphy


The LEGAMUS Transitional Readers are innovative texts that form a bridge between the initial study of Latin via basal textbooks and the reading of authentic author texts. This series of texts is being developed by a special committee of high school and college teachers to facilitate this challenging transition.

Horace: A LEGAMUS Transitional Reader introduces students to Latin selections from Horace’s Satires 1.4 and 1.6 (47 lines) and Odes 1.5, 1.9, 1.11, 1.23, 1.37, 2.10, 3.9, and 3.30 (156 lines). Introductory materials include an overview of the life and works of Horace, historical context, and bibliography. Appendices on grammar, figures of speech, and Horatian meter, as well as a pull-out vocabulary complete the book’s innovative features. After finishing Horace: A LEGAMUS Transitional Reader, students will be prepared to undertake a more complete study of Horace as an upper level Latin literature, AP*, or college level course.

Features:
  • pre-reading materials help students understand underlying cultural and literary concepts
  • short explanations of grammatical and syntactical usage, with exercises
  • first version of the Latin text with transitional aids: implied words in parentheses, difficult noun-adjective pairings in
  • different fonts, words re-ordered to facilitate comprehension
  • complete vocabulary and grammatical notes on same and/or facing pages
  • post-reading materials encourage appreciation of Horace’s style and reflection on what has been read
  • pull-out vocabulary of Latin words not annotated
  • second version of Latin text without transitional aids, but with notes
The well-designed and thoughtful features of Horace: A LEGAMUS Transitional Reader will allow students a smooth entry into reading, understanding, and appreciating the poems of Horace.

Ronnie Ancona is the author of Time and the Erotic in Horace’s Odes (1994), Writing Passion: A Catullus Reader (2004), Horace: Selected Odes and Satire 1.9 (1999, 2nd edition, 2005), coeditor of Gendered Dynamics in Latin Love Poetry (2005), coauthor of A Horace Workbook (2005) and A Horace Workbook Teacher’s Manual (2006), and editor of A Concise Guide to Teaching Latin Literature (2007). Her research interests include Latin lyric poetry, women in Greece and Rome, and Latin pedagogy. She is currently Professor of Classics at Hunter College and The Graduate Center (CUNY). She has been an AP* Latin Exam Reader and has conducted College Board AP* Latin workshops for teachers. For twenty years she directed Hunter’s MA in the Teaching of Latin program. She is coeditor of a series on women in antiquity from Oxford University Press, formerly from Routledge, and series editor for the new college level Bolchazy-Carducci Latin Readers.

David Murphy earned his PhD in Classics from Columbia University. He taught Latin and Greek for over twenty-five years at the secondary school level, including courses that prepared students for both the Vergil and the Latin Literature AP* exams. He also served as Upper School Head at The Nightingale-Bamford School. He has served as an AP* reader for eight years, the last as a table leader, and was trained to give AP* workshops for teachers. He has given papers at meetings of the American Philological Association, the Classical Association of the Atlantic States, and other conferences and has published on paleography, textual criticism, and ancient philosophy. Publications include “Critical Notes on Plato’s Charmides” in Mnemosyne 60, 2007, and “Doctors of Zalmoxis and Immortality in the Charmides” in Proceedings of the V Symposium Platonicum (2000). Dr. Murphy coauthored A Horace Workbook (2005) and A Horace Workbook Teacher’s Manual (2006).

xxiv + 189pp. (2008) Paperback, ISBN 978-0-86516-676-9

Click here to see Horace: A LEGAMUS Transitional Reader at our website.

*AP is a registered trademark of the College Entrance Examination Board,
which was not involved in the production of, and does not endorse, this product.

Wednesday, December 03, 2008

A Lucan Reader

A Lucan Reader: Selections from Civil War
by Susanna Braund



Lucan’s epic poem, Civil War, portrays the stark, dark horror of the years 49 through 48 BCE, the grim reality of Romans fighting Romans, of Julius Caesar vs. Pompey the Great. Latin passages selected for this edition include Lucan’s analysis of the causes of the civil war, depictions of his protagonists Caesar and Pompey at key moments—Caesar’s crossing of the Rubicon, the assassination of Pompey as he arrives in Egypt seeking refuge, Cato’s funeral oration for Pompey, Caesar’s visit to the site of Troy—as well as highly atmospheric passages: Pompey’s vision of his dead wife, Julia; and the necromancy performed by the witch Erichtho for Pompey’s son. Notes illuminate Lucan’s attitude towards his material—his reluctance to tackle the topic of civil war, his complicated relationship with Virgil’s Aeneid, and his passionate involvement in the events through the rhetorical device of apostrophe, when he seems to enter the poem as a character himself.

Features of this edition:
  • Introduction that situates Lucan in his literary, historical, and ideological context
  • 620 lines of Latin text from Lucan’s Civil War: 1.1–45, 67–157, 183–227, 486–504; 3.8–35; 399–445 6.624–53; 7.617–37; 7.647–82, 728–46, 760–811; 8.542–636, 663–88; 9.190–217; 9.961–99
  • Notes at the back
  • Map of the eastern Mediterranean in Caesar’s day
  • Bibliography
  • Vocabulary
Susanna Morton Braund was appointed to a Canada Research Chair in Latin Poetry and its Reception at the University of British Columbia in 2007. Her BA and PhD are from the University of Cambridge; she has taught at the Universities of Exeter, Bristol, and London in the UK; and at Yale University and Stanford University in the USA.
Prof. Braund has published extensively on Roman satire and Latin epic poetry, including a monograph on the Satires of Juvenal (1988), a commentary on Juvenal Satires 1–5 (1996), and a translation of Juvenal and Persius for the Loeb Classical Library (2004). Her 1992 translation (Oxford World’s Classics series) of Lucan’s poem has sold more than 12,000 copies to date. Volumes she has edited or coedited include one on the passions in Roman literature and thought (1997) and another on anger in antiquity (1993). Her introductory book, Latin Literature, was
published by Routledge in 2002.

xxxiv + 134pp. (2008) Paperback, ISBN 978-0-86516-661-5

Click here to see A Lucan Reader at our website.

Tuesday, December 02, 2008

a.d. IV Non. Dec.

Aequat omnes cinis.
–L. Annaeus Seneca

Locus: Moral Epistles 91.16

Wednesday, November 26, 2008

a.d. VI Kal. Dec.

Sera…tacitis poena venit pedibus.
–Albius Tibullus

Locus: Carmina 1.9.4

Tuesday, November 25, 2008

a.d. VII Kal. Dec.

Homines, dum docent, discunt.
–L. Annaeus Seneca

Locus: Moral Epistles 1.7.6

Friday, November 21, 2008

a.d. XI Kal. Dec.

Una dies aperit, conficit una dies.
–Decimus Magnus Ausonius

Locus: de Rosis nascentibus 38

Thursday, November 20, 2008

a.d. XII Kal. Dec.

Audaces Fortuna iuvat timidosque repellit.
–Anonymous

Wednesday, November 19, 2008

a.d. XIII Kal. Dec.

Sua quemque fraus, suus timor maxime vexat.
–Anonymous

Tuesday, November 18, 2008

a.d. XIV Kal. Dec.

Ferrum fero exacuitur.
–St. Jerome

Locus: Vulgate Proverbs 27.17

Friday, November 14, 2008

a.d. XVIII Kal. Dec.

Natura in operationibus suis non facit saltum.
–Carl von LinnĂ©, Swedish botanist, 1707–1778

Thursday, November 13, 2008

Id. Nov.

Litterae non dant panem.
–Medieval

Wednesday, November 12, 2008

pridie Id. Nov.

Divitiae pariunt curas.
–Medieval

Tuesday, November 11, 2008

a.d. III Id. Nov.

Princeps iniustus servos habet et vitiosos.
–Medieval

Friday, November 07, 2008

a.d. VII Id. Nov.

Mortui non dolent.
–Medieval

Thursday, November 06, 2008

a.d. VIII Id. Nov.

Superbus et avarus numquam quiescunt.
–Anonymous

Wednesday, November 05, 2008

Non. Nov.

Mali corvi, malum ovum.
–Anonymous

Thursday, October 30, 2008

a.d. III Kal. Nov.

Prima digestio fit in ore.
–Anonymous

Wednesday, October 29, 2008

a.d. IV Kal. Nov.

Dum spiro, spero.
–Motto

Tuesday, October 28, 2008

a.d. V Kal. Nov.

Insanus medio flumine quaeris aquam.
–Sextus Propertius

Friday, October 24, 2008

a.d. IX Kal. Nov.

Vincis cochleam tarditudine.
–Plautus

Locus: Poenulus 532

Thursday, October 23, 2008

Performing Cicero's Pro Archia

Performing Cicero's Pro Archia
by Jon Hall



This DVD presents a complete performance in Latin of Pro Archia Poeta, Cicero’s defense of the Greek poet Archia and of humanistic education in general.

Designed specifically as a teaching aid for high school and university Latin classes, the DVD includes several special features:

• Full Latin text of Cicero’s Pro Archia, performed by Dr. Jon Hall
• Optional Latin subtitles keyed to the performance of the speech
• English commentary on the speech by Dr. Jon Hall
• Options for playing the complete performance or individual sections of the speech
• Booklet with tips on how to use the DVD, note on pronunciation used, and select bibliography for further reading

Jon Hall has taught in the Classics Department at the University of Otago, New Zealand, since 1993. He is coauthor (with Robin Bond) of Performing Cicero’s Speeches: An Experimental Workshop (Bolchazy-Carducci, 2003) and has published articles and book chapters on the oratory and letters of Cicero.

DVD (2008) ISBN 978-0-86516-707-0

Click here to see Performing Cicero's Pro Archia at our website.

Wednesday, October 22, 2008

a.d. XI Kal. Nov

Stultitiam simulare loco prudentia summa est.
–Anonymous

Tuesday, October 21, 2008

a.d. XII Kal. Nov.

Aliud est celare, aliud tacere.
–Legal

Friday, October 17, 2008

a.d XVI Kal. Nov.

Qui vult caedere canem, facile invenit fustem.
–Anonymous

Thursday, October 16, 2008

a.d. XVII Kal. Nov.

Non senitre mala sua non est hominis, et non ferre, non est viri.
–Seneca

Locus: ad Polybium de Consolatione 17

Wednesday, October 15, 2008

Id. Oct.

Vergil's birthday!

It's been a long time since 70 BC, but we're still reading his works.

Tuesday, October 14, 2008

pridie Id. Oct.

Est quaedam flere voluptas.
–Ovid

Locus: Tristia 4.3.37

Friday, October 10, 2008

a.d. VI Id. Oct.

Fraus est celare fraudem.
–Anonymous

Thursday, October 09, 2008

a.d. VII Id. Oct.

Calendars are in!

Look for yours to be coming in the mail soon. If you don't get a copy, send an e-mail to pete at bolchazy.com with your name and address.

Wednesday, October 08, 2008

a.d. VIII Id. Oct.

Facit indignatio versum.
–Juvenal

Locus: Satires 1.79

Tuesday, October 07, 2008

Non. Oct.

Amat victoria curam.
–Anonymous

Friday, October 03, 2008

a.d. V Non. Oct.

Inuria solvit amorem.
–Lucian

Thursday, October 02, 2008

a.d. VI Non. Oct.

Senatus Populusque Romanus

or

SPQR

Wednesday, October 01, 2008

Kal. Oct.

Stilus virum arguit.
–Anonymous

Tuesday, September 30, 2008

pridie Kal. Oct.

Veritas.
–Motto of Harvard University

Friday, September 26, 2008

a.d. VI Kal. Oct.

Principatus virum ostendit.
–Aristotle

Thursday, September 25, 2008

a.d. VII Kal. Oct.

Ditat Deus.
–Motto of Arizona

Wednesday, September 24, 2008

a.d. VIII Kal. Oct.

Fides facit fidem.
–Anonymous

Tuesday, September 23, 2008

a.d. IX Kal. Oct.

Cucullus non facit monachum.
–Medieval

Thursday, September 18, 2008

a.d. XII Kal. Oct

Necessitas non habet legem.
–Bernard of Clairvaux

More about him (and in Latin too).

a.d. XIV Kal. Oct.

Dies dolorem minuit.
–Robert Burton

Wednesday, September 17, 2008

a.d. XV Kal. Oct.

Spem successus alit.
–Anonymous

Tuesday, September 16, 2008

a.d. XVI Kal. Oct.

Lis litem parit.
–Anonymous

Wednesday, September 10, 2008

a.d. IV Id. Sep.

Nunc populus est domi leones, foris vulpes.
–Petronius

Locus: Satyricon 44.4

Tuesday, September 09, 2008

a.d. V Id. Sep.

Flet victus, victor interiit.
–Anonymous

Friday, September 05, 2008

Non. Sep.

Fraus est celare fraudem.
–Anonymous

Thursday, September 04, 2008

pridie Non. Sep.

Vivit post funera virtus.
–Motto

Wednesday, September 03, 2008

a.d. III Non. Sep.

Cum iocus est verus, iocus est malus atque severus.
–Medieval

Tuesday, September 02, 2008

a.d. IV Non. Sept.

Lis litem parit.
–Anonymous

Wednesday, August 27, 2008

a.d. VI Kal. Sep.

Ex concordia felicitas.
–Motto

Friday, August 22, 2008

a.d. XI Kal. Sep.

Actum… ne agas.
–Terence

Locus: Phormio 419

Thursday, August 21, 2008

a.d. XII Kal. Sep.

Qui nescit tacere nescit et loqui.
–Anonymous

Wednesday, August 20, 2008

a.d. XIII Kal. Sept.

Populus vult decepi: decipiatur.
–Anonymous

Tuesday, August 19, 2008

Rena Rhinoceros

Rena Rhinoceros: Rena the Rhinoceros
by Rose Williams



Rena Rhinoceros is the fourth book of the four-book series, "I Am Reading Latin Stories." Original illustrations and a simple Latin story tell of a little rhinoceros who is impatient to be grown up but learns that this takes time.

The book has features that make reading Latin fun for young children as well as educational: simple Latin questions; an English translation; Latin pronunciation guides; a glossary of Latin words; English derivatives; and notes about basic Latin nouns and verbs.

Each book in the series may be read independently, but as the series progresses, new elements of Latin are gradually added. Rena Rhinoceros adds a few more Latin verb forms (and explanations for them) than the first three books.

iv + 20 pp. (2008) Papberback, ISBN 978-0-86516-699-8

Click here to see Rena Rhinoceros at our website.

Monday, August 18, 2008

Taurus Rex

Taurus Rex: King Bull
by Rose Williams



Taurus Rex is the third book of the four-book series, "I Am Reading Latin Stories." Original illustrations and a simple Latin story tell of a bull who learns that size is not everything and that small folk can help their friends.

The book has features that make reading Latin fun for young children as well as educational: simple Latin questions; an English translation; Latin pronunciation guides; a glossary of Latin words; English derivatives; and notes about basic Latin nouns and verbs.

Each book in the series may be read independently, but as the series progresses, new elements of Latin are gradually added. Taurus Rex has a few more Latin vocabulary words than do the first two as well as the basic verb possum and some simple infinitives

iv + 24 pp. (2008) Papberback, ISBN 978-0-86516-700-1

Click here to see Taurus Rex at our website.

Friday, August 15, 2008

Octavus Octopus

Octavus Octopus: Octavus the Octopus
by Rose Williams



Octavus Octopus is the second book of the four-book series, "I Am Reading Latin Stories." Original illustrations and a simple Latin story tell of a little octopus who does not appreciate his home until he leaves it.

The book has features that make reading Latin fun for young children as well as educational: simple Latin questions; an English translation; Latin pronunciation guides; a glossary of Latin words; English derivatives; and notes about basic Latin nouns and verbs.

Each book may be read independently, but as the series progresses, new elements of Latin are gradually added. Octavus has a few more Latin vocabulary words than does Ursus et Porcus (first in the series), and it mades use of a few adjectives and the basic verb sum.

iv + 26 pp. (2008) Papberback, ISBN 978-0-86516-698-1

Click here to see Octavus Octopus at our website.

Thursday, August 14, 2008

Ursus et Porcus

Ursus et Porcus: The Bear and the Pig
by Rose Williams



Ursus et Porcus is the first book of the four-book series, "I Am Reading Latin Stories." Original illustrations and a simple Latin story (using only 35 words) tell of animals in the forest finding friendship and cooperation.

The book has features that make reading Latin fun for young children as well as educational: simple Latin questions; an English translation; Latin pronunciation guides; a glossary of Latin words; English derivatives; and notes about basic Latin nouns and verbs.

Each book may be read independently, but as the series progresses, new elements of Latin are gradually added. Ursus et Porcus uses a limited Latin vocabulary, with only present and future tense verbs, and nouns mainly in the nominative and accusative cases.

iv + 19 pp. (2008) Papberback, ISBN 978-0-86516-701-8

Click here to see Ursus et Porcus at our website.

Tuesday, August 12, 2008

pridie. Id. Aug.

Aedificare in tuo proprio solo non licet quod alteri noceat.
–Legal

Thursday, August 07, 2008

a.d. VII Id. Aug.

Non refert quam multos libros sed quam bonos habeas.
–Anonymous

Tuesday, July 29, 2008

a.d. IV Kal. Aug.

Turpe est odisse quem laudes.
–Anonymous

Monday, July 28, 2008

a.d. V Kal. Aug.

Stultam fert mentem qui se dicit sapientem.
–Medieval

Thursday, July 24, 2008

a.d. IX Kal. Aug.

Unam virtutem mille vitia comitantur.
–Burton

Wednesday, July 23, 2008

a.d. X Kal. Aug.

Nemo ita pauper vivit quam pauper natus est.
–Anonymous

Tuesday, July 22, 2008

a.d. XI Kal. Aug.

Amans semper quod timet esse putat.
–Ovid

Locus: Ars Amatoria 3.720

Wednesday, July 16, 2008

a.d. XVII Kal. Aug.

Parturiunt montes; nascetur ridiculus mus.
–Horace

Locus: Ars Poetica, 139

Tuesday, July 15, 2008

Id. Iul.

Perique Deum vocibus sequuntur, moribus autem fugiunt.
–Othlonus

Monday, July 14, 2008

We've Moved

We are now in Mundelein.

Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers
1570 Baskin Road
Mundelein, IL 60060


Our phone numbers are still the same:

Toll Free: 800.392.6453
Phone: 847.526.4344 x19
Fax: 847.526.2867

Returns go to the Wauconda address.

Wednesday, July 02, 2008

a.d. VI Non. Iul.

Homo totiens moritur quotiens amittit suos.
–Publilius Syrus

Tuesday, July 01, 2008

The Original Dysfunctional Family

The Original Dysfunctional Family: Basic Classical Mythology for the New Millennium
by Rose Williams



A very accessible introduction to classical mythology, The Original Dysfunctional Family: Basic Classical Mythology for the New Millennium presents the key stories of the twelve Olympians as well as those of the two gods associated with the fruits of the harvest, Demeter and Dionysus. The Greek version of each Olympian is presented first followed by the Roman adaptation. Chock-full of information, this book provides a sound foundation for the beginning student’s further studies in culture, literature, and history. The general reader will find Williams’ style engaging.

Features:
  • Greek version of each Olympian followed by the Roman adaptation
  • Genealogical charts of the Olympian family and their offspring
  • Each set of stories presented in chronological order
  • Notes section for Latin and other special terms employed in the text
  • Illustrations drawn from the corpus of ancient sculpture

x + 62 pp. (2008) Papberback, ISBN 978-0-86516-690-5

Click here to see The Original Dysfunctional Family at our website.

Monday, June 30, 2008

From Romulus to Romulus Augustulus

From Romulus to Romulus Augustulus: Roman History for the New Millennium
by Rose Williams



Readers will delight in the fascinating stories of Rome—the quirky, the gory, and the momentous. This book will serve as the perfect companion for the student beginning to study Latin or as an accessible introduction to Roman history for the general reader. Recognizing the symbiotic relationship between literature and the period in which it was produced, From Romulus to Romulus Augustulus: Roman History for the New Millennium provides a comprehensive overview of Roman history and Latin literature.

Features:
  • Assessment of the critical events in Roman history
  • Presentation of the key historical and literary figures of Rome
  • Timeline of Roman history from its foundation to Theodoric
  • Notes section for Latin and other special terms employed in the text
  • Authentic illustrations from the Roman era


x + 70 pp. (2008) Papberback, ISBN 978-0-86516-691-2

Click here to see From Romulus to Romulus Augustulus at our website.

Friday, June 27, 2008

Latin for the New Millennium: Student Workbook




Student Workbook and Teacher's Manual Now Available.

This new complete introductory course to the Latin language, suitable for both high school and college students, will consist of two volumes, each accompanied by a teacher's manual and students' workbooks. The strategy employed for teaching and learning incorporates the best of both the reading approach and the more abstract grammatical method. The choice of vocabulary in each chapter reflects ancient authors commonly studied for the AP* Latin examinations. There are exercises designed for oral use, as well as a substantial core of more conventional exercises in each chapter. The readings, pictures, and supplementary inserts on cultural information illuminate Roman life, civilization, Roman history, and mythology, as well as the continuing use of Latin after antiquity and its vigorous literary tradition in such periods as the Middle Ages and Renaissance. Each chapter will also include derivatives, the influence of Latin vocabulary on English, and selected proverbs or common Latin sayings.

Visit our website for details.

Thursday, June 26, 2008

a.d. VI Kal. Iul.

Si monumentum requiris, circumpice.
–St. Paul's Cathedral, London

This inscription refers to Sir Christopher Wren, the architect of the current St. Paul's Cathedral in London.

Wednesday, June 25, 2008

a.d. VII Kal. Iul.

Crede mihi, bene qui latuit bene vixit, et intra fortunam debet quisque manere suam.
–Ovid

Locus: Tristia 3.4.25–26

Tuesday, June 24, 2008

a.d. VIII Kal. Iul.

Non nobis, Domine, non nobis, sed nomini tuo da gloriam.
–St. Jerome

Locus: Vulgate, Pslam 115.1

Monday, June 23, 2008

a.d. IX Kal. Iul.

Si vis pacem, para bellum.
–Anonymous

Friday, June 20, 2008

a.d. XII Kal. Iul.

Romae quoque homines moriuntur.
–Medieval

Thursday, June 19, 2008

a.d. XIII Kal. Iul.

Nulla tam bona est fortuna de qua nihil possis queri.
–Publilius Syrus

Wednesday, June 18, 2008

a.d. XIV Kal. Iul.

Redde Caesari quae sunt Caesaris et quae sunt Dei, Deo.
–Vulgate

Locus: Matthew 22.21

Tuesday, June 17, 2008

a.d. XV Kal. Iul.

Lacrimans natus sum et lacrimans morior.
–Medieval

Monday, June 16, 2008

a.d. XVI Kal. Iul.

Stultorum plena sunt omnia.
–Cicero

Locus: Epistulae ad Familiares 9.22

Friday, June 13, 2008

Id. Iun.

Tot mala sum passus quot in aethere sidera lucent.
–Ovid

Locus: Tristia 1.5.47

Thursday, June 12, 2008

pridie Id. Iun

Inter maiores caveas ne multa loquaris.
–Medieval

Wednesday, June 11, 2008

a.d. III Id. Iun.

In quo … iudicio iudicaveritis, iudicabimini.
–Vulgate

Locus: Matthew 7.2

Tuesday, June 10, 2008

a.d. IV Id. Iun.

Mascimur in lacrimis, lacrimabile ducimus aevum; clauditur in lacrimis ultima nostra dies.
–Anonymous

Monday, June 09, 2008

Latin for the New Millennium



Student Textbook Now Available.

This new complete introductory course to the Latin language, suitable for both high school and college students, will consist of two volumes, each accompanied by a teacher's manual and students' workbooks. The strategy employed for teaching and learning incorporates the best of both the reading approach and the more abstract grammatical method. The choice of vocabulary in each chapter reflects ancient authors commonly studied for the AP* Latin examinations. There are exercises designed for oral use, as well as a substantial core of more conventional exercises in each chapter. The readings, pictures, and supplementary inserts on cultural information illuminate Roman life, civilization, Roman history, and mythology, as well as the continuing use of Latin after antiquity and its vigorous literary tradition in such periods as the Middle Ages and Renaissance. Each chapter will also include derivatives, the influence of Latin vocabulary on English, and selected proverbs or common Latin sayings.

Visit our website for details.

Wednesday, June 04, 2008

pridie Non. Iun.

Nunc populus est domi leones, foris vulpes.
–Petronius

Locus: Satyricon 44.4

Tuesday, June 03, 2008

a.d. III Non. Iun.

Discere si quaeris, doceas! Sic ipse doceris.
–Medieval

Monday, June 02, 2008

a.d. IV Non. Iun.

Dum loquor, hora fugit.
–Ovid

Locus: Amores 1.11.15

Wednesday, May 28, 2008

a.d. V Kal. Iun.

Bis peccat qui crimen negat.
–Anonymous

Tuesday, May 27, 2008

a.d. VI Kal. Iun.

Citharoedus ridetur chorda qui semper oberrat eadem.
–Horace

Locus: Ars Poetica 355–356

Wednesday, May 21, 2008

Date change for Webinar

Now on August 4th.

August 4:
"Classical Mythology & More and the Medusa Mythology Exam"
Marianthe Colakis, Townsend Harris High School
This webinar aims to generate discussion among teachers on preparing students for national examinations in mythology, and to show the ways in which Classical Mythology & More can help.

Tuesday, May 20, 2008

a.d. XIII Kal. Iun.

Multos morbos multa fercula fecerunt.
–Seneca

Monday, May 19, 2008

a.d. XIV Kal. Iun.

Venit post multos una serena dies.
–Lygdamus

Friday, May 16, 2008

a.d. XVII Kal. Iun.

Veritas odit moras.
–Seneca

Thursday, May 15, 2008

Id. Mai.

Virtute, non verbis.

Wednesday, May 14, 2008

pridie Id. Mai.

Vivit post funera virtus.
–Motto

Tuesday, May 13, 2008

a.d. III Id. Mai.

Exitus acta probat.
–Ovid

Locus: Heroides 2.85

Monday, May 12, 2008

a.d. IV. Id. Mai.

Invidia, tamquam ignis, summa petit.
–Livy

Friday, May 09, 2008

a.d. VII Id. Mai.

Parva saepe scintilla contempta magnum excitavit incendium.
–Curtius Rufus

Thursday, May 08, 2008

a.d. VIII Id. Mai.

Malo quam bene olere nil olere.
–Martial

Locus: Epigrams 6.55.5

Wednesday, May 07, 2008

Bolchazy-Carducci announces BC Summer School: Webinars for Latin Teachers

Need continuing education units? This summer, expert, published Latin scholars and teachers will be teaching in a new, weekly series of accredited online webinars offered by Bolchazy-Carducci. Whether you're a new Latin teacher looking for teaching tips or a seasoned veteran in search of professional education credits for recertification, our BC Summer webinars offers a diverse menu of options to give you what you need.

More than just an online lecture, attendees can dialogue with each other and the speakers live, view presentations, and explore teaching materials used by the speakers themselves.

Space is limited, so sign up today at www.bolchazy.com

Summer Schedule

June 12: "Using Roman History to Learn Latin Reading Skills"
Rose Williams, Emerita Latin teacher
This webinar will illustrate how teachers can draw from readings from Roman history to illustrate Latin grammar.

June 18: "Teaching Catullus: Pedagogical and Scholarly Perspectives"
Ronnie Ancona, Hunter College, City University of New York
The Catullus webinar will address major features of the teaching of Catullus at both the secondary school and college levels; selections will be used to demonstrate issues of Catullan vocabulary, style, and theme.

June 25: "Roman Art and Archaeology for Latin Teachers"
Jayni Reinhard, Arizona State University
We will take a look at the art and archaeology pertaining to the major sources of Latin texts, including theatres, architectural inscriptions, wall paintings, graffiti.

July 3: "Teaching Horace: Pedagogical and Scholarly Perspectives"
Ronnie Ancona, Hunter College, City University of New York
The webinar will address how to teach Horace at different curricular levels, and recent scholarly perspectives on Horace and how to incorporate them into the high school or college classroom.

July 10: "How to Teach Lucretius"
Bonnie Catto, Assumption College
Catto focuses on excerpts from De Rerum Natura, and discusses college-level linguistic and intellectual aids for translating and comprehending this difficult but magnificent Roman poet.

July 15: "Learning Latin Grammar via Speaking Aloud in Class"
Anna Andresian, Prairie Ridge School
Andresian's presentation will focus on specific techniques for incorporating oral exercises into the Latin classroom, particularly oral methods.

July 17: "Transitioning into Vergil"
LeaAnn Osburn, Emerita Latin teacher
Osburn discusses selections from the Aeneid with a focus on helping students move from elementary or intermediate Latin into reading the authentic Latin of Vergil.

July 24: "Teaching Latin Pronouns through Mythology"
Rose Williams, Emerita Latin Teacher
A brief overview of Greco-Roman mythology, which can be used as an outline for the overall study.

August 4: "Classical Mythology & More and the Medusa Mythology Exam"
Marianthe Colakis, Townsend Harris High School
This webinar aims to generate discussion among teachers on preparing students for national examinations in mythology, and to show the ways in which Classical Mythology & More can help.


August 14: "Learning to Read Ovid"
Caroline Perkins, Marshall College
This webinar will emphasize how to enable the student to make a successful transition from the learning of grammar to the reading of Latin literature and how to teach students of varying levels of preparation in the same classroom.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Cost:
$99.00 per webinar
Take any three for $249.00
Summer subscription (all 10 webinars) for $699.00

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

More webinars will be offered in Fall 2008 by LeaAnn Osburn, Helena Dettmer, Robert Sonkowsky, and more!

*If you are a junior high or high school teacher, check with your school, district, or state department of education prior to enrolling to ensure you will qualify for credits towards professional development. In many states, these webinars may be treated like professional conferences.

Judy Armstrong: jarmstrong@bolchazy.com
(847) 526-4344 ext. 25

www.BOLCHAZY.com

Tuesday, May 06, 2008

pridie Non. Mai.

Fortuna per omnia humana, maxime in res bellicas, potens.
–Livy

Monday, May 05, 2008

a.d. III Non. Mai.

Te tua, me mea delectant.
–Anonymous

Thursday, May 01, 2008

Kal. Mai.

Qui prior strinxerit ferrum, eius victoria erit.
–Livy

Locus: Ab Urbe Condita, 24.38

Wednesday, April 30, 2008

pridie Kal. Mai.

Vitium est omnia credere, vitium nihil credere.
–Pseudo-Seneca

Tuesday, April 29, 2008

a.d. III Kal. Mai.

Amantes de forma iudicare non possunt.
–Robert Burton

Monday, April 28, 2008

a.d. IV Kal. Mai.

Laboribus vendunt dei nobis omnia bene.
–Anonymous

Wednesday, April 23, 2008

a.d. IX Kal. Mai.

Fortis cadere, cedere non potest.
–Family motto

Tuesday, April 22, 2008

a.d. X Kal. Mai.

Beneficium accipere libertatem est vendere.
–Publilius Syrus

Monday, April 21, 2008

a.d. XI Kal. Mai.

Nemo omnia potest scire.
–Terence

Thursday, April 17, 2008

a.d. XV Kal. Mai.

Deo servire vera libertas.
–Medieval

Wednesday, April 16, 2008

a.d. XVI Kal. Mai.

Facile consilium damus aliis.
–Robert Burton

Tuesday, April 15, 2008

a.d. XVII Kal. Mai.

Nam, sive Graeco poetae credimus, aliquando et insanire iucundum est.
–Seneca

Monday, April 14, 2008

a.d. XVIII Kal. Mai.

Stultum est timere quod vitare non potes.
–Publilius Syrus

Thursday, April 10, 2008

a.d. IV. Id. Apr.

Homo sum; humani nil a me alienum puto.
–Terence

Wednesday, April 09, 2008

a.d. V Id. Apr.

Cum ventis litigo.
–Petronius

Locus: Satyricon LXXXIII

Tuesday, April 08, 2008

a.d. VI Id. Apr.

Cum infirmi sumus optimi sumus.
–Pliny the Elder

Monday, April 07, 2008

a.d. VII Id. Apr.

Audio sed taceo.
–Motto

Friday, April 04, 2008

pridie Non. Apr.

Divitiae sunt causa malorum.
–Anonymous

Thursday, April 03, 2008

a.d. III Non. Apr.

Aliena nobis, nostra plus aliis placent.
–Publilius Syrus

Wednesday, April 02, 2008

a.d. IV. Non. Apr.

Dum fata fugimus, fata stulti incurriums.
–Buchanan?

Tuesday, April 01, 2008

Kal. Apr.

Unus anulus ad omnes dominandos, unus ad reperiendos
Unus ad omnes tenebris inferendos ibique vinciendos
–Dominus Annulorum

Friday, March 28, 2008

a.d. V Kal. Apr.

Vulpes non iterum capitur laqueo.
–Anonymous

Thursday, March 27, 2008

a.d. VI Kal. Apr.

Virtus, vel in hoste, laudatur.

Wednesday, March 26, 2008

a.d. VII Kal. Apr.

Ex concordia felicitas.
–Motto

Tuesday, March 25, 2008

a.d. VIII Kal. Apr.

De fumo ad flammam
–Ammianus Marcellinus

Monday, March 24, 2008

a.d. IX Kal. Apr.

Post iacturam quis non sapit?
–Anonymous

Friday, March 21, 2008

Ovid: A LEGAMUS Transitonial Reader

Ovid: A LEGAMUS Transitional Reader
by Denise Davis-Henry and Caroline Perkins



Ovid: A LEGAMUS Transitional Reader introduces students to Latin selections (202 lines) from Ovid’s Metamorphoses: Apollo and Daphne, 1.463–473, 490–502, 548–567; Pyramus and Thisbe, 4.65–77, 93–104, 137–153; Daedalus and Icarus 8.195–208, 220–235; Baucis and Philemon, 8.626–640, 705–720; Pygmalion 10.243–269, 270–297. Introductory materials included an overview of the life and work of Ovid, bibliography, and the characters in the selections. Appendices on grammar and figures of speech, and a pull-out vocabulary complete the book’s innovative features. After finishing Ovid: A LEGAMUS Transitional Reader, students will be prepared to undertake a more complete study of the Ovid as an AP* or college level course.

Features:
  • pre-reading materials help students understand underlying cultural and literary concepts
  • short explanations of grammatical and syntactical usage, with exercises
  • first version of the Latin text with transitional aids: implied words in parentheses, difficult noun-adjective pairings in different fonts, words re-ordered to facilitate comprehension
  • complete vocabulary and grammatical notes on facing pages
  • post-reading materials encourage appreciation of Ovid’s style and reflection on what has been read
  • pull-out vocabulary of Latin words not annotated
  • second version of Latin text in without transitional aids, but with notes

The well-designed and thoughtful features of Ovid: A LEGAMUS Transitional Reader will allow students a smooth entry into reading, understanding, and appreciating the Metamorphoses of Ovid.

Caroline Perkins is professor and chair of the department of Classics at Marshall University in Huntington, West Virginia. She holds a PhD from The Ohio State University. She has won teaching awards at Marshall University, is the author of several articles on Tacitus and Ovid, and has given numerous presentations on these and other authors. She is a tireless promoter of the study of Classics in her adopted state, and most recently has helped to add an MA in Latin to the degrees offered by Marshall University.

Denise Davis-Henry holds an MA from The Ohio State University. She has taught Latin at Bishop Watterson High School since 1986. Her passion for Classical mythology brought her to the classics, and she enjoys organizing and leading student tours to Europe, including Italy and Sicily, Greece, France, Switzerland, and Roman Britain.


xxvi + 132 pp. (2008) Papberback, ISBN 978-0-86516-604-2

Click here to see Ovid: A LEGAMUS Transitional Reader at our website.

*AP is a registered trademark of the College Entrance Examination Board, which was not involved in the production of, and does not endorse this product.

Thursday, March 20, 2008

a.d. XIII Kal. Apr.

Amphora sub veste numquam portatur honeste.
–Medieval

Wednesday, March 19, 2008

Cicero and Horace: Vocabulary Frequency Lists for AP* Selections

Cicero and Horace: Vocabulary Frequency Lists for AP* Selections
by David R. Pellegrino



Horace and Cicero Frequency Lists for AP* Selections consists of four lists of the most frequent words met in the required lines of the Horace and Cicero AP* Latin Literature curriculum. The Latin words for each author are listed in two different ways. The first is a list with words divided into frequency of occurrence (15+ times, 9–14 times, 5–8 times), designed for review of the most frequent vocabulary words found in Horace and Cicero. The second is a list to be used as a glossary.

The lists are formatted so that the student can use an index card to cover either the Latin or the English to work on vocabulary building. Definitions are limited to those applicable to the required lines of the AP* Horace and Cicero curricula, which makes these lists less frustrating to use than most glossaries and dictionaries.

Features
  • Two vocabulary lists for each author (Horace and Cicero)
  • First list is designed for review, and gives the most frequent words (those used 5 or more times) in the AP* Latin Literature curriculum lines for that author, separated by frequency of occurrence (15+ times, 9–14 times, 5–8 times)
  • Second list is a complete vocabulary of all words occurring in the curriculum lines, for use as a handy glossary, with: • Definitions limited to those found in the AP* curriculum, to minimize frustration and discouragement •Full listing of all cases for personal and reflexive pronouns, to reinforce recognition of these forms
David R. Pellegrino has been teaching Latin for twenty years. He has experience with both middle level and high school Latin. He majored in Latin at the State University of New York, Albany, where he subsequently gained an MA in Latin Education. He is the past president of the Classical Association of the Empire State and is currently Latin teacher at Pittsford Mendon High School.

iv + 74 pp. (2008) Paperback, ISBN 978-0-86516-684-4

Click here to see Cicero and Horace: Vocabulary Frequency Lists for AP* Selections at our website.

*AP is a registered trademark of the College Entrance Examination Board, which was not involved in the production of, and does not endorse this product.

Tuesday, March 18, 2008

a.d. XV Kal. Apr.

Multitudo non ratione ducitur sed impetu.
–Anonymous

Monday, March 17, 2008

a.d. XVI Kal. Apr.

Amicus in necessitate probatur.
–Medieval

Wednesday, March 12, 2008

Upcoming conferences

Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers will be at:

North Dakota Home School Association's 2008 Convention
13–15 March 2008
Alerus Center, Grand Forks, ND

Nebraska Christian Home Educators Association 2008 Convention
4–5 April 2008
Indian Hills Community Church, Lincoln, NE

Tuesday, March 11, 2008

a.d. V Id. Mar.

Umbram suam metuit.
–Q. Tullius Cicero

Friday, March 07, 2008

Slovak Songs

Slovak Songs in Latin • Slovak • English with 170 Music Scores and 93 Illustrations
translated by Bystrik Muransky



This trilingual songbook represents a Slovak heirloom.

It includes:
  • 170 new Neo-Latin songs, a first publication of a 1963 translation of Slovak lyrics, into Latin—hymns and folk songs
  • 170 music scores for the lyrics
  • A newly edited edition of 170 Slovak lyrics
  • 49 English versions of Slovak lyrics
  • trilingual introductions, bilingual index, bibliography
Presenting to the world 170 New Folk Melodies Ethnographic Reference book about Slovakia to enjoy and build upon—all from Slovakia, the Heart of Europe

xvi + 224 pp. (2008) Hardbound, ISBN 978-0-86516-567-0

Click here to see Slovak Songs in Latin • Slovak • English at our website.

Thursday, March 06, 2008

pridie Non. Mar.

Non uno ictu arbor cadit.
–Medieval

Wednesday, March 05, 2008

a.d. III Non. Mar.

Virtute fideque.
–Motto

Tuesday, March 04, 2008

a.d. IV Non. Mar.

Ubi amor, ibi oculus.
Robert Burton

Monday, March 03, 2008

a.d. V Non. Mar.

Fraus sublimi regnat in aula.
–Seneca

Friday, February 29, 2008

pridie Kal. Mar.

Prudens cum cura vivit, stultus sine cura.
–Medieval

Thursday, February 28, 2008

a.d. III Kal. Mar.

Fide et fortitudine.
–Motto

Wednesday, February 27, 2008

a.d. IV Kal. Mar.

In Venere semper dulcis est dementia.
–Publilius Syrus

Tuesday, February 26, 2008

a.d. V Kal. Mar.

Ut fragilis glacies, interit ira mora.
–Ovid

Locus: Ars Amatoria 1.374

Monday, February 25, 2008

a.d. VI Kal. Mar.

Flos in pictura non est, nisi sola figura.
–Medieval

Friday, February 22, 2008

a.d. VII Kal. Mar.

Nulla dies sine linea.
–Anonymous

Thursday, February 21, 2008

a.d. IX Kal. Mar.

Nemo laeditur nisi a se ipso.
–Anonymous

Wednesday, February 20, 2008

a.d. X Kal. Mar.

Ex alieno periculo sapiens se corrigit et emendat.
–Medieval

Tuesday, February 19, 2008

a.d. XI Kal. Mar.

Numquam ex malo patre bonus filius.
–Anonymous

Monday, February 18, 2008

a.d. XII Kal. Mar.

Constantia et virtute.
–Motto

Friday, February 15, 2008

a.d. XV Kal. Mar.

Spes mea in Deo.
–Motto

Thursday, February 14, 2008

a.d. XVI Kal. Mar.

Quando lunam oculum tuum pulsat sicut placenta neapolitana, amor est.
–Dean Martin

Wednesday, February 13, 2008

Id. Feb.

Victoria concordia crescit.
–Motto

Friday, February 08, 2008

a.d. VI Id. Feb.

Gladiator in arena consilium capit.
–Lucius Annaeus Seneca

Thursday, February 07, 2008

a.d. VII Id. Feb.

Ex ungue leonem.
–Anonymous

Wednesday, February 06, 2008

a.d. VIII Id. Feb.

Sus Minervam.
–Cicero

Locus:Academia 1.5

Tuesday, February 05, 2008

Non. Feb.

Homo proponit sed Deus disponit.
–Thomas a Kempis

Monday, February 04, 2008

Pidie Non. Feb.

Iam frater fratrem, iam fallit filia matrem, iamque pater natum, iam fallit amicus amicum.
–Medieval

Friday, February 01, 2008

Kal. Feb.

Timidus vocat se cautum, avarus parcum.
–Anonymous

Thursday, January 31, 2008

pridie Kal. Feb.

Fide et litteris.
–Motto of St. Paul's School, London

Wednesday, January 30, 2008

a.d. III Kal. Feb.

Quaerit aquas in aquis.
–Ovid

Locus: Amores 2.2.43

Tuesday, January 29, 2008

a.d. IV Kal. Feb.

Post tenebras lux.
–Anonymous

Monday, January 28, 2008

a.d. V Kal. Feb.

Tempore felici multi numerantur amici.
–Medieval

Friday, January 25, 2008

a.d. VIII Kal. Feb.

Nulla regula sine exceptione.
–Medieval

Thursday, January 24, 2008

a.d. IX Kal. Feb.

Crimine nemo caret.
–Anonymous

Wednesday, January 23, 2008

a.d. X Kal. Feb.

Virescit vulnere virtus.
–Motto

Tuesday, January 22, 2008

a.d. XI Kal. Feb.

Ab honesto virum bonum nihil deterret.
–Lucius Annaeus Seneca

Monday, January 21, 2008

a.d. XII Kal. Feb.

Virtute et numine.
–Motto

Friday, January 18, 2008

a.d. XV Kal. Feb.

Asinus asinum fricat.
–Anonymous

Thursday, January 17, 2008

a.d. XVI Kal. Feb.

Rex regnat sed non gubernat.
–Legal

Wednesday, January 16, 2008

a.d. XVII Kal. Feb.

Ubi est thesaurus tuus, ibi est et cor tuum.
—Gospel of Matthew

Locus: Evangelium Secundum Matthaeum, 6.21

Tuesday, January 15, 2008

a.d. XVIII Kal. Feb.

Alieno in loco haud stabile regnum est.
–Lucius Annaeus Seneca

Monday, January 14, 2008

a.d. XIX Kal. Feb.

Nil bene pauper agit.
–Medieval

Friday, January 11, 2008

a.d. III Id. Ian.

Mobile mutatur semper cum principe vulgus.
–Medieval

Thursday, January 10, 2008

a.d. IV Id. Ian.

Est verum verbum: frangit Deus omne superbum.
–Medieval

Wednesday, January 09, 2008

a.d. V Id. Ian.

Ubi libertas, ibi patria.
–Anonymous

Tuesday, January 08, 2008

a.d. VI Id. Ian.

Homo sine religione sic ut equus sine freto.
—Medieval

Monday, January 07, 2008

a.d. VII Id. Ian.

Nullum sine exitu iter est.
–Lucius Annaeus Seneca

Wednesday, January 02, 2008

APA / AIA in Chicago

Come one and come all!

The American Philological Association and the Archaeological Institute of America (and not those Architect guys) will be meeting in Chicago from 3 to 6 January at the Hyatt Regency (151 E. Wacker).

Be sure to stop by booth 211 to say hello to us.