Friday, June 03, 2016

May Answer for Roman Calendar

If you have not already done so, check the inside back cover of our 2015-16 Roman Calendar for a reproducible worksheet that asks students to engage with the mythology-oriented artwork included in the calendar.

For those completing the worksheet, here is May's image, question, and answer.
 
Question: Mercury is the patron god of a wide range of domains. How many symbols are included in this statue? With what domain is each associated?

Answer: The winged cap references Mercury's role as the messenger of the gods. The money pouch is a symbol of Mercury as god of trade and commerce (and may also allude to his status as patron god of thieves). The caduceus, the herald's sign, is another reference to his role as messenger but is not visible in the cropped image used in the calendar.


Think your students know the answer to the June question on the worksheet? Tweet @BCPublishers the answer by June 25th for a chance to win five of our new buttons. We'll announce our answers, as well as the winner, at the beginning of June. Submit an answer for your class, or better yet, encourage students to participate individually.

To add your name to our mailing list for the Roman Calendar, email orders@bolchazy.com with the subject line "Roman Calendar"; be sure to include your name and mailing address in the body of the mail. Calendars are mailed annually in August.

Tuesday, May 03, 2016

April Answer for Roman Calendar

If you have not already done so, check the inside back cover of our 2015-16 Roman Calendar for a reproducible worksheet that asks students to engage with the mythology-oriented artwork included in the calendar.

For those completing the worksheet, here is April's image, question, and answer.

Question: Many sculptures from antiquity lack some or all of their limbs, which tend to be thinner than other parts of the sculpture and therefore more susceptible to damage. What might Ceres have been holding?

Answer: Ceres may have been holding wheat or poppies as symbols of her power over the fertility of plants, or a torch as a symbol of her role in the form of marriage known as confarreatio.

Think your students know the answer to the May question on the worksheet? Tweet @BCPublishers the answer by May 25th for a chance to win five of our new buttons. We'll announce our answers, as well as the winner, at the beginning of June. Submit an answer for your class, or better yet, encourage students to participate individually.

To add your name to our mailing list for the Roman Calendar, email orders@bolchazy.com with the subject line "Roman Calendar"; be sure to include your name and mailing address in the body of the mail. Calendars are mailed annually in August.

Thursday, April 28, 2016

What Makes The Other Middle Ages an "Other" Text?

Kenneth F. Kitchell, Jr.'s new book, The Other Middle Ages introduces intermediate Latin students to selections that cover all aspects and all walks of life, from bawdy songs to to somber religious rituals and impudent parodies of the same, from short anecdotes and fables to excerpts from the bestiary tradition.

The book contains seventy-nine selections of prose and poetry, grouped thematically into categories that include "Echos of Antiquity," "The Black Death," and "Attacks on the Church," among others. While some selections have been edited for clarity and length, most are unadapted. Latin students can expect to finish one or more of these enjoyable readings in one sitting, developing their reading skills and giving them a sense of accomplishment. Notes and vocabulary have been provided to guide students accustomed to classical Latin through reading medieval texts drawn from a range of centuries and genres.

But what makes this text different from other medieval Latin texts? What makes the selections of this particular textbook "other"? We corresponded with Kitchell for his input on the matter:

"The main thing is that this is the first medieval Latin reader that I know of that was designed from the ground up to appeal to today's students. The readings are immediately accessible to today's students because it does not presuppose any previous knowledge of medieval culture or history. It is totally devoted to types of texts that other books only show in one or two examples. Thus it is also a much easier book to teach from if the teacher is not already a medievalist.

"All the readings have been classroom tested for three decades to gauge their interest level and readability. Boring texts that stirred no interest in students were tossed. Throughout this period, student input helped form the number and nature of notes, always trying to give students what they need to be able to sit down and just read the texts almost immediately after they have acquired the basics of Latin grammar and vocabulary. These texts are a great deal more accessible to intermediate students than, say, Cicero is.

"The basic thing, if I can put it this way, is that this book is a lot more fun for students and teachers alike and gives a new vehicle by which teachers and students alike can enter a type of Latin literature that is generally overlooked."

This accessible, classroom-tested, "other" medieval Latin readercan be found on our website.


Monday, April 25, 2016

Homer Wins: A Recap of Martia Dementia 2016

An image of the final
Martia Dementia bracket.
The path to victory appeared to be wide open. Augustus crushed his competition like bricks and left marble in his wake. Last years finalists, Lucan and the returning champion Euclid, both fell in the second round, and having delivered a decisive blow to Alexander the Great, the emperor seemed to be on the cusp of victory. But Augustus underestimated the epic bard Homer. Homer, who delivered to the world the epics the Iliad and the Odyssey. Homer, who, as a 5 Seed, rolled over the likes of Sophocles and Plutarch, and just as easily beat Hesiod and Ovid. Homer beat Augustus 157-4 to win the 2016 Martia Dementia competition. Much like last year, many narratives came out of the bracket as voting created conflict between these authors, philosophers, and political figures, and there was plenty of opportunity for others; imagine if Ovid had beat Homer and was given the opportunity for vengeance? These narratives and the success of Martia Dementia happened all thanks to our participants.

Don't ask B-C's Connor Hart about what happens when
you have Caesar and Michigan State going all the way.
The response to Martia Dementia was again overwhelming, building off last years success. I would like to thank all the teachers, professors, friends, students, and anyone I may have left out for their participation. I would also like to take time to acknowledge and congratulate the following for their success in this years competition. First, to Ryan Schumacher of the Bullis School, who only had two picks in the Sweet Sixteen, I say congratulations for having the most abysmal bracket! To Derrick Thomas III, also of the Bullis School, who, with only one correct pick in the Final Four, still managed to pick up 43 points, I would also like to say congratulations for taking third place! To Ruth Loop of the Thomas Dale High School, who managed to slip into second place with 44 points despite having one finalist, Augustus, going no further than the Sweet Sixteen, I would like to say congratulations for finishing in second place! Lastly, I congratulate the Brookfield Academy Upper School, sponsored by their teacher Ruth Osier, who, having 75% of the Final Four correct and nothing but right picks from there, won this years Martia Dementia!

Still disappointed in how your brackets turned out? Want to prepare for a better outing next year? Osier let us know what it took to make her classroom a winning one: 
Several (basketball) students were very amused by the idea of Greeks and Romans facing off.  Heated debates began on Vergil vs. Plautus or Pompey vs. Trajan.  Since there was such controversy, I instructed the debaters to fill out brackets and I would take the most common threads and send a copy to enter in the contest.  Around a dozen students turned in forms to me.  Once it was submitted, copies of our bracket were distributed to all students with an explanation of how to vote.  Then we left on spring break and I assumed the students would forget to vote and it would end then.  But when we returned they were excited that most (not all) of their picks were still in the running.  As each round concluded and voting began again, I allowed the students to have a couple minutes at the beginning of class that day to vote.  When we arrived at the final four the students started to get friends and relatives to vote.  At the end of the tournament, every day the students asked if I had heard if we won because our choices seemed to move on at every level.  When I was able to announce Victoria est nobis! cheers broke out.  The students enjoyed the fun of the competition and I enjoyed introducing names and history lessons to the students who didn’t know all the teams.
A Roman copy of a bust of Homer,
in the British Museum, London.
Perhaps with the debates and controversy the road to victory got off to a bumpy start, but it would seem things ran smoothly once Osier found common threads in her classrooms brackets. After that, all it took was a little outside support, some dedication and cooperation, and a lot of votes, for the Brookfield Academy Upper School to take home the spolia victoriae. Congratulations again!

Looking forward to next years Martia Dementia? Already counting down the days? Want to see an author, politician, or philosopher who did not make it into this years bracket? Would you rather see gods and goddesses versus heroes versus beasts? Tweet @BCPublishers what and who you would like to see, and include the hash tag #MartiaDementia or give feedback in the comments below. Did you have questions or comments about how this years competition went? Were you able to find ways to incorporate Martia Dementia into the classroom, or do you have ideas of how you might next year? Comment below–I would love to hear from you!

Friday, April 01, 2016

March Answer for Roman Calendar

If you have not already done so, check the inside back cover of our 2015-16 Roman Calendar for a reproducible worksheet that asks students to engage with the mythology-oriented artwork included in the calendar.

For those completing the worksheet, here is March's image, question, and answer.

Question: What elements identify this as a statue of Mars?

Answer: The helmet, the use of heroic nudity, and the defined musculature identify this statue as Mars.

Think your students know the answer to the April question on the worksheet? Tweet @BCPublishers the answer by April 25th for a chance to win five of our new buttons. We'll announce our answers, as well as the winner, at the beginning of May. Submit an answer for your class, or better yet, encourage students to participate individually.

To add your name to our mailing list for the Roman Calendar, email orders@bolchazy.com with the subject line "Roman Calendar"; be sure to include your name and mailing address in the body of the email. Calendars are mailed annually in August.

Tuesday, March 01, 2016

Vocabulary Quizzes for Ubi Fera Sunt

Recently Bolchazy-Carducci announced the arrival of Ubi Fera Sunt, a Latin translation  by Rick A. LaFleur of Maurice Sendak's beloved Where the Wild Things Are. The book, with its limited vocabulary, makes a great addition to Latin classrooms of any level. To help make it an effective resource in the classroom, we have provided links to several quizzes that will make it fun and easy for students to master the vocabulary. Quizzes and instructions on how to use each format  can be found on our web page here, under the "Digital Content" tab.

One platform, Quia, functions as either a take-home quiz for the students to finish for practice on their own or as one for the students to complete during class. It lists the Latin or English for the students and they must type in the correct translation.

The other platform, Kahoot, is primarily an in-class quiz. The teacher displays a Latin word with four possible translations, and it is up to the student to choose the correct one.

For teachers who don't use Quia or Kahoot, LaFleur has also provided a complete vocabulary list, divided by parts of speech, which is also available under the "Digital Content" tab.

February Answer for Roman Calendar

If you have not already done so, check the inside back cover of our 2015-16 Roman Calendar for a reproducible worksheet that asks students to engage with the mythology-oriented artwork included in the calendar.

For those completing the worksheet, here is January's image, question, and answer.
To add your name to our mailing list for the Roman Calendar, email orders@bolchazy.com with the subject line "Roman Calendar"; be sure to include your name and mailing address in the body of the mail. Calendars are mailed annually in August.



Question: Following a convention of fifteenth-century Florence, Venus (second from left) is here depicted with wings on her head. What Greek words are written on the apple that Paris is about to give Venus? Translate those words into Latin.

Answer: The text on the golden apple is ΤΗ ΚΑΛΗ (τῂ καλῇ, transliterated as tē kalē), “for the beautiful (one).” Traditionally the phrase is given as τῂ καλλίστῃ (superlative, “for the most beautiful”), but one can understand why the artist chose to use the much shorter positive degree of the adjective. In Latin, this could be translated as pulchrae, formōsae, etc.

Think your students know the answer to the March question on the worksheet? Tweet @BCPublishers the answer by March 25th for a chance to win five of our new buttons. We'll announce our answers, as well as the winner, at the beginning of April. Submit an answer for your class, or better yet, encourage students to participate individually.

To add your name to our mailing list for the Roman Calendar, email orders@bolchazy.com with the subject line "Roman Calendar"; be sure to include your name and mailing address in the body of the mail. Calendars are mailed annually in August.

Monday, February 29, 2016

Martia Dementia 2016

Ancient Figures Martia Dementia

The madness is back! In the next month Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers will bring back Martia Dementia, the tournament that put ancient authors against one another last year. Who could have predicted Lucan besting Euclid in the finals? This year, we have created a bracket of the top 32 authors from last year and have added 32 philosophers and political figures. With your help, one of them will rise above the others as champion of the Mediterranean. To the victor belong the spoils, and whoever finishes with the best bracket, spoils await. Before getting to the prizes, here is the way the competition will work.

The Bracket
There are two parts to the participation in this event; the first is the bracket. Contestants will need to download a bracket from below, when made available, and save it as a PDF file. Having done this, simply advance the authors of your choosing through the bracket, writing in your picks and eliminating the others, until one remains above the rest. Once filled out, send the bracket to the email provided on the bracket. The rankings are random. There is no rater’s index or previous statistics to consider, and no author has an advantage over another. The only factor determining an author’s advancement is your participation. Filling out the bracket to be eligible for the prizes is the minimum requirement.

The Survey
The second way to participate is the survey. To further improve your chances of winning, a survey will be available for each round (below) where you can vote for your picks or, as it gets closer to the championship, vote against any picks that might hurt your chances of winning. This aspect is separate from the bracket and not necessarily required, but actively participating in the survey betters your chances at winning. We will determine the victors of each match by who has the most survey votes by the time the survey closes.

We cannot stress enough the importance of voting early and voting often. So when the survey goes live, cast your votes; get your friends to vote for your picks; teachers, get your students to stuff the survey with favorable votes.

Victori Spolia
The competition is not solely for bringing posthumous glory to your favorite ancient figure. Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers is offering book prizes for the brackets that most closely resemble the final results; a $100 book credit will be awarded to the first-place participant, a $50 credit to the second-place participant, and a $25 credit to the person finishing in third place. Feeling like you no longer stand a chance? Do not give up! There will also be a $25 credit for having the most abysmal bracket! So get ready, and stay tuned. Brackets will be available Friday and the voting madness begins Tuesday, March 15!

-Connor Hart

Be sure to bookmark this post, as we will post the survey links for each round as they become available here:

Bracket

Round of 64

Round of 32

Sweet Sixteen

Elite Eight

Final Four

Championship Round

Monday, February 01, 2016

January Answer for Roman Calendar

If you have not already done so, check the inside back cover of our 2015-16 Roman Calendar for a reproducible worksheet that asks students to engage with the mythology-oriented artwork included in the calendar.

For those completing the worksheet, here is January's image, question, and answer.

Question: What other gods are commonly depicted with a full beard and long hair? How can you identify which god is shown here?

Answer: Jupiter, Bacchus, and Neptune and other water deities, such as Tiberinus, were commonly depicted with full beards. The trident and the attendant holding a conch shell identify him as Neptune.

Think your students know the answer to the January question on the worksheet? Tweet @BCPublishers the answer by February 25th for a chance to win five of our new buttons. We'll announce our answers, as well as the winner, at the beginning of March. Submit an answer for your class, or better yet, encourage students to participate individually.

To add your name to our mailing list for the Roman Calendar, email orders@bolchazy.com with the subject line "Roman Calendar"; be sure to include your name and mailing address in the body of the mail. Calendars are mailed annually in August.

Friday, January 29, 2016

Greek Beats: Greek Grammar Set to Catchy Electronic Music


Engage your student in learning Greek grammar through aural, oral, visual, and kinetic learning.

Like Toga Beats did for Latin, these tracks of Greek grammar, set to catchy electronic music and lyrics, make the Greek stick in your head like a favorite song! Listen to the tracks, read along on the lyrics sheet, sing the lyrics yourself with the karaoke tracks, and, if the music moves you, dance to the beat of declensions and conjugations!


Purchase the Greek Beats Complete Collection, which includes all twenty-one tracks and the lyrics sheet. Purchase the individual tracks as needed in your Greek classroom. (Purchase links on the Greek Beats Complete Collection page.) Purchase the Karaoke Collection to tap into your creativity and your student's creativity. 


The karaoke version, available for purchase separately, contains the music from all twenty-one tracks without the lyrics. Make sure to create an account before purchasing to be able to access downloads for multiple devices. 


Download the first track FREE!


Available as individual tracks or download all twenty-one at a reduced price.

Tuesday, January 05, 2016

December Answer for Roman Calendar Worksheet

If you have not already done so, check the inside back cover of our 2015-16 Roman Calendar for a reproducible worksheet that asks students to engage with the mythology-oriented artwork included in the calendar.

For those completing the worksheet, here is December’s image, question, and answer.

Question: Aside from the lyre, how can you identify this as Apollo?

Answer: The crown of laurel combined with the youthful appearance and the beardless, smooth face indicate that this is Apollo.

Think your students know the answer to the January question on the worksheet? Tweet @BCPublishers the answer by January 25th for a chance to win five of our new buttons. We’ll announce our answers, as well as the winner, at the beginning of February. Submit an answer for your class, or encourage students to participate individually.


To add your name to our mailing list for the Roman Calendar, email orders@bolchazy.com with the subject line “Roman Calendar”; be sure to include your name and mailing address in the body of the email. Calendars are mailed annually in August.

November Answer for Roman Calendar Worksheet

If you have not already done so, check the inside back cover of our 2015-16 Roman Calendar for a reproducible worksheet that asks students to engage with the mythology-oriented artwork included in the calendar.

For those completing the worksheet, here is November’s image, question, and answer.

Question: Can you identify this sculpture as Diana based on the detail image of her head? What other elements do you think the full sculpture contains that identify the goddess as Diana?

Answer: The crescent moon crown identifies the goddess as Diana. The full statue features a quiver with arrows, a stag, and a skirt shortened to knee-length to make hunting easier, all of which further identify the sculpture as Diana.


Think your students know the answer to the December question on the worksheet? Tweet @BCPublishers the answer by December 25th for a chance to win five of our new buttons. We’ll announce our answers, as well as the winner, at the beginning of January. Submit an answer for your class, or encourage students to participate individually.

To add your name to our mailing list for the Roman Calendar, email orders@bolchazy.com with the subject line “Roman Calendar”; be sure to include your name and mailing address in the body of the email. Calendars are mailed annually in August.