Monday, February 01, 2016

January Answer for Roman Calendar

If you have not already done so, check the inside back cover of our 2015-16 Roman Calendar for a reproducible worksheet that asks students to engage with the mythology-oriented artwork included in the calendar.

For those completing the worksheet, here is January's image, question, and answer.

Question: What other gods are commonly depicted with a full beard and long hair? How can you identify which god is shown here?

Answer: Jupiter, Bacchus, and Neptune and other water deities, such as Tiberinus, were commonly depicted with full beards. The trident and the attendant holding a conch shell identify him as Neptune.

Think your students know the answer to the January question on the worksheet? Tweet @BCPublishers the answer by February 25th for a chance to win five of our new buttons. We'll announce our answers, as well as the winner, at the beginning of March. Submit an answer for your class, or better yet, encourage students to participate individually.

To add your name to our mailing list for the Roman Calendar, email orders@bolchazy.com with the subject line "Roman Calendar"; be sure to include your name and mailing address in the body of the mail. Calendars are mailed annually in August.

Friday, January 29, 2016

Greek Beats: Greek Grammar Set to Catchy Electronic Music


Engage your student in learning Greek grammar through aural, oral, visual, and kinetic learning.

Like Toga Beats did for Latin, these tracks of Greek grammar, set to catchy electronic music and lyrics, make the Greek stick in your head like a favorite song! Listen to the tracks, read along on the lyrics sheet, sing the lyrics yourself with the karaoke tracks, and, if the music moves you, dance to the beat of declensions and conjugations!


Purchase the Greek Beats Complete Collection, which includes all twenty-one tracks and the lyrics sheet. Purchase the individual tracks as needed in your Greek classroom. (Purchase links on the Greek Beats Complete Collection page.) Purchase the Karaoke Collection to tap into your creativity and your student's creativity. 


The karaoke version, available for purchase separately, contains the music from all twenty-one tracks without the lyrics. Make sure to create an account before purchasing to be able to access downloads for multiple devices. 


Download the first track FREE!


Available as individual tracks or download all twenty-one at a reduced price.

Tuesday, January 05, 2016

December Answer for Roman Calendar Worksheet

If you have not already done so, check the inside back cover of our 2015-16 Roman Calendar for a reproducible worksheet that asks students to engage with the mythology-oriented artwork included in the calendar.

For those completing the worksheet, here is December’s image, question, and answer.

Question: Aside from the lyre, how can you identify this as Apollo?

Answer: The crown of laurel combined with the youthful appearance and the beardless, smooth face indicate that this is Apollo.

Think your students know the answer to the January question on the worksheet? Tweet @BCPublishers the answer by January 25th for a chance to win five of our new buttons. We’ll announce our answers, as well as the winner, at the beginning of February. Submit an answer for your class, or encourage students to participate individually.


To add your name to our mailing list for the Roman Calendar, email orders@bolchazy.com with the subject line “Roman Calendar”; be sure to include your name and mailing address in the body of the email. Calendars are mailed annually in August.

November Answer for Roman Calendar Worksheet

If you have not already done so, check the inside back cover of our 2015-16 Roman Calendar for a reproducible worksheet that asks students to engage with the mythology-oriented artwork included in the calendar.

For those completing the worksheet, here is November’s image, question, and answer.

Question: Can you identify this sculpture as Diana based on the detail image of her head? What other elements do you think the full sculpture contains that identify the goddess as Diana?

Answer: The crescent moon crown identifies the goddess as Diana. The full statue features a quiver with arrows, a stag, and a skirt shortened to knee-length to make hunting easier, all of which further identify the sculpture as Diana.


Think your students know the answer to the December question on the worksheet? Tweet @BCPublishers the answer by December 25th for a chance to win five of our new buttons. We’ll announce our answers, as well as the winner, at the beginning of January. Submit an answer for your class, or encourage students to participate individually.

To add your name to our mailing list for the Roman Calendar, email orders@bolchazy.com with the subject line “Roman Calendar”; be sure to include your name and mailing address in the body of the email. Calendars are mailed annually in August.

Friday, December 11, 2015

Ubi Fera Sunt: Where the Wild Things Are in Latin

Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers is proud to announce the arrival of Ubi Fera Sunt, the first published Latin translation (by Richard A. LaFleur) of the beloved children's story Where the Wild Things Are, by Maurice Sendak. This lively translation faithfully and playfully recasts Sendak’s unique writing style into classical Latin. It includes the beautifully remastered images employed in the fiftieth anniversary edition. Where the Wild Things Are has been published in numerous other languages, including French, German, Spanish, Hebrew, and even Finnish, but never until now into classical Latin.

Richard A. LaFleur, a.k.a. Doctor Illa Flora, has provided resources to enhance the classroom experience for his Latin translation. "Why NOT a Latin Wild Things" offers insight as to why LaFleur decided to translate Sendak's work and his hopes that "this modern rendering of his . . . charming classic" will join the Latin canon alongside other children's classics such as Winne Ille Pu and Cattus Petasatus. LaFleur has also provided an "About the Translation" resource to explain his always correct, but at times "Sendakian," choices in Latin. "Pronouncing Latin" gives Latin readers a refresher on pronunciation, while it also serves as a great tool for those learning and new to Latin. Lastly, LaFleur offers a glossary of all the Latin words employed in his translation. These resources are all designed to make Ubi Fera Sunt as effective a classroom component as it is a fun one.

Thursday, December 03, 2015

Lucretius: The Nature of the Universe

G. B. Cobbold's The Nature of the
Universe is an accessible translation
 of Lucretius's De Rerum Natura.
Lucretius:The Nature of the Universe is now in stock! This prose translation of De Rerum Natura offers an accessible encounter with Lucretius, who is at pains to convince readers of one main point: that their fears of death and punishment in the afterlife cripple them in their daily lives, and these dark fears can only be conquered by the light of rationality he offers through the philosophy of his Greek predecessor, Epicurus. This work does not fit into any of our ideas of distinct disciplines of knowledge. Instead, it smashes boundaries: science and poetry, religion and philosophy all find their place here, as do the profound and the mundane: the many and varied properties of atoms; stories of gods, heroes, and monsters; vivid descriptions of rainspouts, sex, a mother cow lowing for her newly sacrificed calf, human evolution.

Reading Stephen Greenblatt’s The Swerve: How the World Became Modern with the ACL Book Club? Cobbold’s translation is an excellent way to encounter the work that influenced Galileo, Montaigne, Jefferson, Freud, Darwin, Yeats, Santayana, Einstein, and many others—including our late founder, Lou Bolchazy.

If you’re looking to experience Lucretius’s thought in the original Latin (which Cicero described as having “lights of genius”—lumina ingenii), check out Bonnie A. Catto’s Lucretius: Selections from De Rerum Natura, which features notes and vocabulary along with illustrative quotations from ancient as well as modern authors.

Friday, November 13, 2015

Dolus aut Dulce? Halloween Costume Contest Results

Lydia Haile Fasset, dressed as
a wolf, holds her twin girls,
Secunda, left, and Prima, who
dress as Romulus and Remus.
Over the past month we asked teachers and students to dress up in classics-themed costumes for Halloween and to send their pictures to us through Twitter. We requested that those already intending to dress send us pictures as well. Though we had a nice mix of students and teachers send pictures to us, we will be seeking greater participation from both next year!
Mont Allen, right, and partner
Stephanie Pearson dress as a
blue-skinned Charun and
an Etruscan noblewoman.

Still, it was nice to see such an array of costumes, ranging from traditional Roman mythology, to Greek grammar, and even an Etruscan Charun and noblewoman! Thank you to all who participated, and congratulations to the winners, who were randomly selected from the pool of participants.

Congratulations to winner Mont Allen, Assistant Professor of Classics & Art History at Southern Illinois University. He and partner Stephanie Pearson, Assistant Professor of Classical Archaeology at the Humboldt University-Berlin, dressed together as a blue-skinned, hook-nosed Charun, one of the psychopompoi of Etruscan mythology, "claiming" an Etruscan noblewoman clutching her mirror.
Rebeccaa Sahlin, in her
rainbow bustle and train,
dresses as the personification
of the rainbow, Iris.

Congratulations also to our second winner, Lydia Haile Fassett. Another group entrant, she and her twin girls, who go by their Latin names of Prima and Secunda, dressed as Romulus and Remus, founders of Rome, with the maternal wolf who found and raised them in their infancy.

Lastly, congratulations to our third winner, Rebecca Sahlin. She dressed as Iris, personification of the rainbow and messenger of the gods, with a rainbow bustle and train.

Did you miss out on this year's Halloween contest? Be sure to follow us on Twitter and like us on Facebook to keep up to date with upcoming contests, new books, and conference and webinar schedules!

Monday, November 02, 2015

October Answer for Roman Calendar Worksheet

If you have not already done so, check the inside back cover of our 2015-16 Roman Calendar for a reproducible worksheet that asks students to engage with the mythology-oriented artwork included in the calendar.

For those completing the worksheet, here is October's
This Vatican statue depicts Bacchus,
the god of wine and festivities.
image, question, and answer.

Question: What symbols in this statue identify the subject as Bacchus?

Answer: Classicists will identify this Vatican statue as Bacchus for several reasons. As Ovid writes, "The god himself, garlanded by clustered grapes in respect to his forehead, waves a wreathed wand" (Metamorphoses 2.666). Though this statue of Bacchus does not include the wand, it does capture the garland referenced in Ovid's epic poem. In Ovid, as well as in other sources, Bacchus is called boyish and youthful, but as often as he is depicted thus, artists choose to portray him as older and bearded. This sculptor clearly chose the latter take. Lastly, he holds a drinking vessel and a bunch of grapes, representative of his position as the god of wine.

Think your students know the answer to the November question on the worksheet? Tweet @BCPublishers the answer by November 25th for a chance to win five of our new buttons. We’ll announce our answers, as well as the winner, at the beginning of December. Submit an answer for your class, or encourage students to participate individually.

To add your name to our mailing list for the Roman Calendar, email orders@bolchazy.com with the subject line “Roman Calendar”; be sure to include your name and mailing address in the body of the email. Calendars are mailed annually in August.

Monday, October 05, 2015

Dolus aut Dulce? The Bolchazy-Carducci Costume Contest

Hail Caesar! The late Lou Bolchazy
sporting a toga at ACL 2005.
Are you dressing up in a toga for Halloween? Perhaps you've decided to finally wear that old aegis you've had lying around? Maybe you will be sporting one hundred peacock feathers, once held by the head of Argos? Bolchazy-Carducci urges you to! We not only suggest you do, but if you decide to dress up in classics garb, take a picture and send it our way!

Marie Bolchazy wearing a
floral stola and matching
garland at ACL 2005.
All we need from you is a photo of you in a classics-themed picture. Send it to us via Twitter to @BCPublishers, using the hash tag #BCPub. Do this, and you automatically make yourself eligible for one of three prizes! One photo will be accepted per Twitter account. If multiple people are in one picture all wearing classics costumes, the prize would only go to the owner of the account that tweeted the picture. If by request the contestants ask that another member of the picture stand as the contestant, one that is not the Twitter account member, or not a Twitter member at all, we will accept that as well.

Teachers, tell your students; students, tell your teachers. Tell all of your friends. No need to wait until October 31 to send a picture. We will start accepting photos this week and will continue to accept pictures until 11:59 PM CST on Tuesday, November 2nd. Even if it is not your Halloween costume, so long as you have a photo featuring a classics-themed costume, we'll take it!

Monday, September 28, 2015

Introducing the Newly Redesigned Roman Calendar

The 2015–2016 Roman Calendar has arrived! In the newly redesigned calendar, you will find full-color images featuring the Olympian gods alongside the ever-popular sententiae. The calendar also contains information about our latest books, longtime favorites, apps, and more. Check the inside back cover for a reproducible worksheet that asks students to engage with the artwork included in the calendar.

For those completing the worksheet, here is September's image, question, and answer.
Francesco Solimena's Venus
at the Forge of Vulcan
.

Question:
In this scene, Vulcan presents arms to Venus. For whom are they intended? In what literary work is this story told? How many weapons and types of armor can you identify?

Answer:
Francesco Solimena’s Venus at the Forge of Vulcan is based on a scene from the Aeneid (8.370–449, 608–25) in which Venus asks Vulcan to make new weapons for Aeneas. Solimena’s painting depicts a helmet, a sword, a shield (described at length in Aeneid 8.626–731), a breastplate, and an axe.

Think you know the answer to the remaining questions on the worksheet? Starting in October, tweet @BCPublishers your answer to that month’s question by the 25th for a chance to win five of our new buttons. We’ll announce our answers, as well as the winner, at the beginning of the following month. Submit an answer for your class, or encourage students to participate individually.

To add your name to our mailing list for the Roman Calendar, email orders@bolchazy.com with the subject line “Roman Calendar”; be sure to include your name and mailing address in the body of the email. Also, let us know by email if you have not received your calendar yet!

Friday, September 18, 2015

Bringing Apps into the Classroom

When teaching language, no problem, arguably, causes more student angst than vocabulary acquisition. If you find that students are struggling to keep up with the amount of vocabulary that textbooks hand your students*, then tell them Bolchazy-Carducci has a solution: flashcard vocabulary apps for their smart phones! Products of gWhiz LLC, they act as companions to Latin for the New Millennium, Level 1 and Level 2Caesar: Selections from his Commentarii De Bello Gallico, and Vergil’s AENEID: Selected Readings from Books 1, 2, 4, and 6, and at $9.99 they are no more expensive than a comparable app. Additionally, while the LNM apps are designed for use with their respective, they could be helpful to any introductory Latin course.

Students choose from four different
modes: Adaptive, Self-Test/Quiz,
Flashcard Boxes, and Matching Game.
The flashcard vocabulary apps work just like a traditional set of flash cards, only now students don't have to worry about lugging around stacks of paper to and from class, misplacing some words (thus failing to master them!), or, sadly, remembering to look at them. Students will have the app right on their phone (and will never leave home without their phone), allowing students to keep all their cards in their pockets and on their persons at all times. The apps provide nearly 500 words for each of the LNM sets and an average of 200 flashcards for both the Caesar and the Vergil sets. Each flash card contains the Latin word, including principal parts for verbs and gender for nouns on the front, and the English definition and part of speech on the back. Additionally, each app provides four different study modes: Adaptive, Self-Test/Quiz, Flashcard Boxes, and Matching Game.

The Adaptive study mode passes through each card, keeping track of the known and the unknown, or the learned and the unlearned, words. Students determine themselves whether they know the word or not. Furthermore, the Adaptive study mode allows students to study the vocabulary chapter by chapter or in the entirety of the set, while also allowing students to revisit the words. Lastly, this mode allows students to switch between studying Latin to English and English to Latin.

Students can choose between a
multiple choice option or just
a single - the correct - option.
The Quiz mode is a lot like the Adaptive mode in presentation. It allows students to quickly evaluate their knowledge of the material while providing the student with a "Study Score," or a percentage of how many words the student knows. However, unlike the Adaptive mode, students can only test their knowledge on each flashcard once without starting over. In this way, Quiz mode accurately determines how much and what words the students need to study. The students also have the option of quizzing themselves in multiple choice form or without any options to choose from. 

The Flashcard Boxes mode uses boxes to sort the students's knowledge of the material. The cards can be filed into either the "Known," the "Unknown," or the "Mastered" box for future review. All the cards start in the "Unknown" box and as students cycle through the sets, they place the cards in the appropriate boxes based on their comfort with each. Afterward, students can choose which vocabulary box to study from to freshen up on the mastered cards and drill in the unknown ones - a great way for students to review many weeks' worth of materials for a midterm!

The Matching Game is an alternative to the standard style of flashcard drilling. The cards are set in a grid size of the students's choice, either 6, 9, 16, or 24 pairs. Then they simply hit the back of a card and try to remember its location while they hunt for its match. As the student slowly picks off each pair, they simultaneously unveil the image in the background. Match each pair to reveal the full image! There are a lot of pictures so the the students will have to solve each puzzle to reveal them all.

In addition to the activities, the app allows students to customize the appearance to suit their needs. They can adjust the font style as well as the size. So don't wait! Let students review and master the literary-rich vocabulary from multiple Bolchazy-Carducci titles and Latin authors using traditional flashcard quizzing from Latin to English or English to Latin, or explore other functions of the app. Vocabulary study has never been so easy or so convenient! And if you and your students like the gWhiz apps, stay tuned for a future blog post where I cover the multimodal vocabulary program, eyeVocab.

Do you have experience with gWhiz vocabulary apps that you would like to share? Are there unanswered questions remaining about how to use the apps? Have you experimented with other means of vocabulary acquisition? Do your students have opinions on the apps you would like to share? Leave a question or comment below! I would love to hear from you.

-Connor Hart

*Note that for this reason, LNM includes both a Reading Vocabulary list and a list of Vocabulary to Know.