Wednesday, November 23, 2016

Latin for the New Millenium Second Edition

Second Edition Coming Soon

Bolchazy-Carducci’s tradition of listening to teachers, enlisting their input, and learning of their needs has regularly led us to develop new materials. Teachers’ desire for a Latin series that fused the traditional grammar approach with the reading method led our late founder Ladislaus J. Bolchazy, PhD, to commission renowned Latin language educators and living Latin enthusiasts Milena Minkova and Terence Tunberg to author Latin for the New Millennium.

Again, heeding LNM users, we are developing a second edition of LNM 1 and 2 coming spring 2017. Teachers and students who have come to love LNM's literary-rich vocabulary, supplementary cultural information, and substantial core of conventional exercises, will appreciate the second edition and its new features. Key new features include an enhanced focus on derivatives and additional exercises that provide reinforcement and laddering activities. We’ve also added Latin readings from the female polymaths Hildegard von Bingen and Anna Maria van Schurman to the LNM 2 workbook. 

Visit our website for more details. For specifics on LNM Second Edition, click here, and scroll to the bottom for a chapter by chapter list of changes.

Monday, November 14, 2016

Dolus aut Dulce? Halloween Costume Contest Results

Lindsey Morse decorated her
hair up with snakes, completing
her change into Ms. Medusa.
Ian Hochberg and his family
dressed as deities and
demigods.
Over the past month we asked teachers and students to dress up in classics-themed costumes for Halloween and to send their pictures to us through Twitter.

It was nice to see such an array of costumes, ranging from traditional Roman deities, to Hannibal preparing to cross the Alps, and even the mythological gorgon Medusa! Thank you to all who participated, and congratulations to the winners, who were randomly selected from the pool of participants.

Congratulations to winner Ian Hochberg of St. Stephen's & St. Agnes School in Alexandria, VA. He and his family dressed together as Hercules, Iris, Zeus, and Artemis. "Wise Athena," Ian said, was "busy tutoring."

Congratulations also to our second winner, Lindsey Morse of Stratford Academy in Macon, GA. Students sat stone-faced as their teacher, with snakes in her hair, transformed into Ms. Medusa.
Winston Durand went all out
for his Hannibal costume.

Lastly, congratulations to our third winner, Winston Durand, a student of Latin teacher Matt Davis at Miramonte High School in Orinda, CA. Winston dressed as the military general Hannibal, fully suited for battle and for the cold, as he prepares to go over the Alps.

Did you miss out on this year's Halloween contest? Be sure to follow us on Twitter and like us on Facebook to keep up to date with upcoming contests, new books, and conference and webinar schedules!

Thursday, November 03, 2016

October Answer for Roman Calendar

If you have not already done so, check the inside back cover of our 2016–2017 Roman Calendar for a reproducible worksheet that asks students to engage with the derivative-oriented artwork included in the calendar.

For those completing the worksheet, here is October's image, question, and answer.

Question:
Nūlla terra exsilium est sed altera patria. This line is expressed in Dē remediīs fortuītōrum, sometimes attributed to Seneca. What English words derive from this line?

Answer: 
The adjective nūlla, meaning "none," has given such words as "nullify" to the English language. The first declension noun terra, meaning "land," has provided "terrain" and "subterranean." The neuter noun for "exile,"exsilium, yields such words as "exile.Est, the third person, present, active, singular form of the verb esse, meaning "to be," has given English the word "essence." The adjective altera, meaning "the other (of two)" has given such words as "alterable" and "altruistic." The first declension noun patria, meaning "fatherland," yields such words as "expatriate" and "repatriation."

To add your name to our mailing list for the 2017–2018 Roman Calendar, email orders@bolchazy.com with the subject line “Roman Calendar”; be sure to include your name and mailing address in the body of the email. Also, let us know by email if you have not received your calendar yet!

Think your students know the answer to the November question on the worksheet? Tweet @BCPublishers the answer by November 25th for a chance to win five of our new buttons. We'll announce our answers, as well as the winner, at the beginning of December. Submit an answer for your class, or better yet, encourage students to participate individually.

Monday, October 24, 2016

Texas Foreign Language Association 2016

The Latin for the New Millennium banner
beckons teachers to the B-C booth
Allan Bolchazy, Bolchazy-Carducci vice president, represented the company at the 2016 Texas Foreign Language Association (TFLA) Conference, held October 13–15, 2016, in Austin, TX, at the Renaissance Hotel. Phil Neill and Joni Dodson, B-C’s sales representatives for the state of Texas (with its 1,100 school districts!), assisted Allan in staffing the B-C booth.

Thursday evening saw publishers give presentations on their programs and texts. This is unusual for the conference, but since Texas is conducting a textbook adoption, they decided the publisher presentations would be desirable. Allan gave a presentation that provided attendees an overview of Latin for the New Millennium and its three levels and an overview of the company’s Caesar and Vergil texts designed for the AP Latin curriculum.

The exhibit hall was open all day Friday, and Saturday morning. Visitors to the B-C booth demonstrated great interest in our books. In addition to Latin teacher visitors, a Slovak gentleman, who remembered the late B-C founder Ladislaus "Lou" Bolchazy and his Slovak books, visited the booth. A number of other teachers and department chairs came by seeking information for their Latin teacher colleagues.

We had a great time talking with friends, customers, and all attendees. Were you unable to make the conference and still have questions? Did you attend and would you like to share a part of your experience? Feel free to comment or ask questions below. I'd love to hear from you!

-Connor

Tuesday, October 18, 2016

Illinois Classical Conference 2016 Report

The Illinois Classical Conference met October 7–9 at Stevenson High School in Lincolnshire, IL.  Assistant editor Laurel Draper represented Bolchazy-Carducci over the weekend. Chris Mural, the Latin teacher at Stevenson, was the local host and the organizer of the book exhibit. The ICC used book exchange, which raises money for scholarships, was also in the book exhibit.

One of the highlights of the weekend was Saturday’s luncheon. The luncheon was co-hosted with the Chicago Classical Club and featured a talk from Daniel Garrison (Northwestern University) on Latin as a modern language. Peter Burian (Duke University) gave the keynote address, titled “The Stronger Sex: Athenian Democracy and the Case of Lysistrata.” Matthew Sparapani, last year’s Teacher of the Year, spoke on the importance of community within the Latin classroom and within the classics profession.

Another highlight from the weekend was the awards ceremony. Chris Mural received the Teacher of the Year award. Marilyn Brusherd, a longtime member of ICC, the organizer of the book exchange, and a perennial volunteer at classics events for high school students, received the Lifetime Achievement Award.

Overall we had a great time talking with friends, customers, and all attendees. Were you unable to make the conference and still have questions? Did you attend and would you like to share a part of your experience? Feel free to comment or ask questions below. I'd love to hear from you!

-Connor

Tuesday, October 04, 2016

September Answer for Roman Calendar

The 2016–2017 Roman Calendar offers full-color images for each month featuring a chapter title page from Latin for the New Millennium, Levels 1 and 2, Second Edition, alongside the ever-popular sententiae. The calendar also contains information about our latest books, longtime favorites, apps, and more. Check the inside back cover for a reproducible worksheet that asks students to engage with the artwork included in the calendar.

For those completing the worksheet, here is September's image, question, and answer.

Question:
Ōdī et amō. Catullus wrote these contradictory words to express his conflicted and painful feelings about his beloved in Catullus 85. What English words can you find that derive from these three?

Answer: 
Ōdī, from the fourth conjugation verb odīre meaning "to hate," has given such words as "odious," "odium," and "ennui" to the English language. The conjunction et has provided "etc." (et cetera, "and the rest") and the ampersand (&). A, from the first conjugation verb amāre  meaning "to love," yields such words as "amatory," "amorous," "enamor," and "paramour."

To add your name to our mailing list for the 2017–2018 Roman Calendar, email orders@bolchazy.com with the subject line “Roman Calendar”; be sure to include your name and mailing address in the body of the email. Also, let us know by email if you have not received your calendar yet!

Think your students know the answer to the October question on the worksheet? Tweet @BCPublishers the answer by October 25th for a chance to win five of our new buttons. We'll announce our answers, as well as the winner, at the beginning of November. Submit an answer for your class, or better yet, encourage students to participate individually.

Friday, September 30, 2016

Dolus aut Dulce? 2016: The Bolchazy-Carducci Costume Contest

Autumn has fallen upon us at last. Apples are leaving the orchards in bunches, leaves are taking up new residence on the ground, and people are compiling ideas for this year's Halloween costume.

Mont Allen, dressed as a Charun,
claimed the first place prize and
an Etruscan noblewoman (partner
Stephanie Pearson) last year.
We at Bolchazy-Carducci are happy to announce our second annual Halloween costume contest: Dolus aut Dulce? It was so nice seeing all the wonderful costumes from last year's participants, such as the blue-skinned, hook-nosed Charun and Etruscan noblewoman combination submitted by last year's winner, Mont Allen, and partner Stephanie Pearson. So if you plan on sporting a toga with some laurels, going for the whole hoplite, or fashioning your own set of wax wings, we urge you to take a picture of your classics-themed costume and send it to us.

Marie Bolchazy and the late Lou
Bolchazy dressed for ACL 2005 in
a floral stola and a toga, respectively.
Like last year, all we need from you is a photo of you in a classics-themed costume. Send it to us via Twitter to @BCPublishers, using the hash tag #BCPub. Do this, and you automatically make yourself eligible for one of three prizes! One photo will be accepted per Twitter account. If multiple people are in one picture all wearing classics costumes, the prize would only go to the owner of the account that tweeted the picture. If by request the contestants ask that another member of the picture stand as the contestant, one that is not the Twitter account member, or not a Twitter member at all, we will accept that as well.

Teachers, tell your students; students, tell your teachers. Tell all of your friends! No need to wait until October 31 to send a picture. We will start accepting photos this week and will continue to accept pictures until 11:59 PM CT on Tuesday, November 1st. Even if it is not your Halloween costume, so long as you have a photo featuring a classics-themed costume, we'll accept it!

Friday, September 23, 2016

Bolchazy-Carducci: A Year in Review

Tempus fugit! Looking back, 2016 was quite an eventful year full of conferences, contests, and new books for the classroom. Before 2017 sneaks up on us, we thought we would take a second to recap everything that's happened in the last twelve months.

The Bolchazy-Carducci booth at Kalamazoo, MI. 
Conferences. Bolchazy-Carducci has been all over the continental United States this past year. Assistant editor Laurel Draper went over to Monmouth, IL, for the Illinois Classical Conference in October. Shortly afterward editor Don Sprague found himself in Wilmington, DE, at the Classical Association of the Atlantic States, returning for a moment before heading back east, to Syracuse, NY, for the Classical Association of the Empire State. These few weeks set the pace, for in the subsequent months, B-C staff traveled to San Diego, CA (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) and San Francisco, CA (Archaeological Institute of America/Society for Classical Studies and American Classical League); Austin, TX (Modern Language Association and American Classical League); Williamsburg, VA (Classical Association of the Middle West and South); Northampton, MA (Classical Association of New England); Kalamazoo, MI (International Congress on Medieval Studies); and Bloomington, IN (National Junior Classical League). Did you miss us on our national tour? Don't worry, you can follow this link to find out which conferences we will be going to next.

Mont Allen, right, and partner
Stephanie Pearson dress as a
blue-skinned Charun and
an Etruscan noblewoman.
Contests. With the above conferences came almost as many fishbowl drawings. Some people went home with a medieval Latin book bundle, others with an annotated Latin textbook collection, and some with brand new titles from the past year. Regardless of the bundle, the winners, teachers, and students alike went home happy. This past year marked the first time Bolchazy-Carducci conducted a classics-themed Halloween costume contest, Dolus aut Dulce? We saw some beautiful costumes from students, teachers, and entire classrooms. Mont Allen, Assistant Professor of Classics & Art History at Southern Illinois University, and partner Stephanie Pearson, Assistant Professor of Classical Archaeology at the Humboldt University-Berlin, dressed together as a blue-skinned, hook-nosed Charun, one of the psychopompoi of Etruscan mythology, "claiming" an Etruscan noblewoman clutching her mirror and claiming the prize to this year's contest. The second annual Martia Dementia contest was even more successful than last year's, with more participation from students and teachers. Homer claimed the throne previously held by Lucan, and the Brookfield Academy Upper School, sponsored by their teacher Ruth Osier, took home the glory and the spoils. Make sure you follow us on Twitter and Facebook so that you never miss out on a chance to win B-C prizes. What will you win next year?


Richard LaFleur's translation
of Maurice Sendak's classic,
Where the Wild Things Are.
New Books. We had a lot of exciting new releases this past year. Bonnie Catto released Latin Mythica II: Troia Captaa follow-up to her Latina Mythica,. Rose Williams's Latin of New Spain, a set of representative selections from Neo-Latin works, hit the shelves as well. Dale Grote's The Vulgate of Mark with the Synoptic Parallels brought engaging narratives of the Vulgate to the Latin classroom. Jo-Ann Shelton provided students with insight into political and social life of ancient Rome with Pliny the Younger: Selected LettersG. B. Cobbold gave a lively prose rendition of all six books of the De Rerum Natura with his Lucretius: The Nature of the Universe. Kenneth Kitchell gave selections covering all aspects of medieval life with The Other Middle Ages: A Medieval Latin Reader. Lastly, Richard LaFleur provided a lively translation of Maurice Sendak's classic children's book with Ubi Fera Sunt: Where the Wild Things Are in Latin.


Founder Ladislaus "Lou" Bolchazy sporting a toga.
Founder's Day. Lastly, this year marked the 4-year anniversary of the passing of Bolchazy-Carducci founder Ladislaus "Lou" Bolchazy. Good food and good company filled the office as old friends and colleagues joined us in Mundelein for an annual luncheon as we celebrated Founder's Day. Everyone looked back fondly on the founder and the legacy he left behind.

Looking Ahead. That about wraps up the 2015–2016 year. We anticipate just as much excitement in the upcoming year. Students and teachers can look forward to more contests, such as Dolus aut Dulce? and Martia Dementia. Look forward to seeing us at a conference near you too, so be sure to enter a fishbowl drawing to win a book bundle. Here's to the 2016–2017 year!

Friday, September 02, 2016

Welcome Back to Latin

Welcome back! We at Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers hope that you enjoyed your summer and are ready for another exciting and rewarding school year! While the first week back is full of syllabi, class expectations, new names (and new, more grown-up faces to go with old names), and more, we know you want to jump right into learning as well. This post gathers some ideas for that first week back.

Let us know how these work. If you have a favorite welcome-back activity you'd like to share, let us know. We'll include it in next year's welcome back write-up.

B-C author Rose Williams
receiving the ACL Merita
Award from ACL president
 Kathy Elifrits back in June.
Decorate your classroom, Latinē. This idea is simple. Have your students break into groups to write Latin vocabulary on index cards and affix them to the appropriate item in the room. Prepare a list or let students use a dictionary and their own creativity.

Visit Italy. Hand out or project a blank map of Italy (you can find a free one in the Digital Content Tab on the product page for A Roman Map Workbook) and have students guess where certain key ancient cities and geographical features are. For Vergil classes, the free map of The Wanderings of Aeneas found on our Digital Resources for Teachers link could be used. For those interested in speaking and introducing simple sentences, Rose Williams has an excellent example of a map lesson for the first day of Latin.

Learn something new about (your)self. Have students research the etymology of their names and then present them to the class. This could easily be combined with other common ice-breakers like the old stand-by 'what they did over the summer.' Students could also choose a Latin name as part of this activity.

Write a story, Latinē. The easiest way to do this is to use a story you've already written and remove some words like a Mad-Libs. You can find several of these on the internet, like here and here. If you write your own, you can work in characters from myth or history for extra review. To help introductory classes, you may want to hand out cards with suggested vocabulary and have students choose a card to play for each blank. If you like this activity, The Pericles Group sells a polished card game version you may want to invest in.

Celebrate birthdays early. Use a calendar with Latin quotes (the free one from B-C works great, download here if you didn't get a copy in the mail). Give each student the quote from their birthday to to translate or present.  This activity creates the opportunity to revisit each quote throughout the year on the student's birthday and as you learn the grammar each contains.

Do you have any experience using these ideas you would like to share? Are there other activities or resources you use? Feel free to comment below. I'd love to hear from you!

Thursday, September 01, 2016

August Answer for Roman Calendar

If you have not already done so, check the inside back cover of our 2015-16 Roman Calendar for a reproducible worksheet that asks students to engage with the mythology-oriented artwork included in the calendar.
For those completing the worksheet, here is August’s image, question, and answer.

Question: How can you identify this sculpture as Minerva? What do you think she held in each hand?

Answer: The helmet and the Gorgon head identify this sculpture as Minerva. She may have held a spear in one hand and a shield in the other.

English derivatives are the focus of the 2016-17 Roman Calendar reproducible worksheet (inside back cover). Tweet @BCPublishers your answer to that month’s question by the 25th for a chance to win five of our new buttons. We’ll announce our answers, as well as the winner, at the beginning of the following month. Submit an answer for your class, or encourage students to participate individually.

To add your name to our mailing list for the Roman Calendar, email orders@bolchazy.com with the subject line "Roman Calendar"; be sure to include your name and mailing address in the body of the mail. Calendars are mailed annually in August.

Friday, August 19, 2016

Something's Blooming in Bloomington

2016 National Junior Classical League Report

Social Media and Editorial Assistant Connor Hart working
the B-C booth after Don and he set up on Wednesday.
This year marked the 63rd Annual National Junior Classical League Convention. It was held at Indiana University in Bloomington, IN, from July 24 to July 29, 2016. Forest Hall was open to book exhibits July 27 to 29. Don Sprague and Connor Hart, having braved the congested traffic of Tristate-294 and monstrous trucks of Interstate-65, made it to Bloomington Tuesday night to represent Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers. During their time there they managed a booth of books and buttons while teachers, students, and parents of classicists came and went.

Editor Don Sprague with student
Carlos Cerda who took home the 

B-C book bundle.
Traffic was steady and interest strong at the conference. Students seemed very interested in the wide selection of prose authors and poets to choose from in the BC Latin Readers. Many students were also thrilled about the Dr. Seuss and Shel Silverstein books, as well as the children's books authored by B-C president Marie Bolchazy. However, they were most enthusiastic to have a copy of Ubi Fera Sunt in their hands. Also, like last year in San Antonio, many of the students showed an interest in Greek language books, primarily for independent use.

We held a fish bowl drawing again this year, and had even more teachers and students sign up than previous contests. Student Carlos Cerda of Strake Jesuit College Preparatory in Houston, TX, took home the book bundle of culture resource books that included Classical Mythology & More, To Be A Roman, Latin Everywhere, Everyday, and A Roman Map Workbook. With his busy schedule sending him all over the beautiful limestone campus, his mother, Elizabeth Cerda, who introduced Carlos to Latin when she home schooled him, stopped by and said hi and picked up the bundle. Later, Carlos stopped by to meet Don and Connor.

NJCL proved a great opportunity for Connor, our social media and editorial assistant, to experience the fruits of his labors. Ruth Osier, whose class entry won Martia Dementia, stopped by to redeem her prize—a $100 gift certificate for B-C materials. She shared with Connor in real time how much her students enjoyed participating in the contest. Matthew Moore, who was the Roman Calendar winner for the month of June, also stopped by and chatted with Connor. (Note: Learn how Ruth Osier employed Martia Dementia as a class project. Check out the April 2016 issue of eLitterae.)
The Trojan Horse in downtown Bloomington, IN.

Did you attend NJCL this year? How was your experience, and what did you like? Will you be attending next year? We will! See you in Troy, Alabama!

-Connor Hart

Monday, August 01, 2016

July Answer for Roman Calendar

If you have not already done so, check the inside back cover of our 2015-16 Roman Calendar for a reproducible worksheet that asks students to engage with the mythology-oriented artwork included in the calendar.

For those completing the worksheet, here is July’s image, question, and answer.

Question: Four of the elements in this sculpture—the statue in Jupiter’s right hand, the scepter in his left, the eagle, and his clothing—were added in the 19th century. Why do you think each was added? Who is the statue in his right hand?

Answer: The eagle is a symbol of Jupiter, often associated with him in mythology and art. The scepter signifies Jupiter’s status as king of the gods. The statue is Victoria (in Greek Nike), goddess of victory. In Greek mythology, Nike was Zeus’s charioteer when he fought for control of Mt. Olympus; she was often associated with him. Jupiter is often depicted wearing clothing such as that seen in this sculpture—though the restorers who added it may also have been concerned about modesty.

Think your students know the answer to the August question on the worksheet? Tweet @BCPublishers the answer by August 25th for a chance to win five of our new buttons. We'll announce our answers, as well as the winner, at the beginning of September. Submit an answer for your class, or better yet, encourage students to participate individually.

To add your name to our mailing list for the Roman Calendar, email orders@bolchazy.com with the subject line "Roman Calendar"; be sure to include your name and mailing address in the body of the mail. Calendars are mailed annually in August.

Tuesday, July 19, 2016

Acquaintances and Awards in Austin: An ACL 2016 Wrap-Up

Editor Don Sprague sits behind the
Bolchazy-Carducci book display 
at the 69th Annual ACL in Austin, TX
The 69th Annual Institute of the American Classical League took place at the University of Texas in Austin, TX Sunday June 26 through Tuesday June 28, 2016 with 280 in attendance. Allan Bolchazy, Don Sprague, and Laurel Draper represented Bolchazy-Carducci. The daytime temperatures in Austin were in the 90’s and the humidity quite high.


ACL President Kathy Elifrits
presenting Rose Williams
with the Merita Award.
The exhibit space was at the San Jacinto Center in a nice open and light-filled room with plenty of space for folks to move around. Registration and break refreshments were in the same room. B-C prepared a special display for the book exhibit that included all of Rose Williams’s B-C books, a poster, and a bouquet of yellow roses.

Nancy Yust, one of two winners
of the B-C book bundles "fishbowl"
drawing, displaying her
winnings at ACL in Austin.
One of the highlights of the Institute was the Meritus/Merita Award presentation at the banquet. Rose Williams received the Merita Award and B-C author Gaylan DuBose (Farrago Latina: A Teacher Resource and, with Marianthe Colakis, Excelability in Advanced Latin) received the Meritus Award. Ginny Lindzey (Gaylan's former student who teaches Latin at Dripping Hills High School, TX) won the Norman Goldman costume award.
Kathleen Durkin, one of two winners B-C
book bundle drawings, happily holds her
newly obtained books.

Another highlight of the Institute was the Bolchazy-Carducci "fishbowl" drawing. This year we again offered two book bundles. Congratulations to the winners! Nancy Yust and Kathleen Durkin each took home a bundle of books. When attending conferences, always be sure to stop by our booth, so that you don't miss an opportunity to win prizes.

Overall we had a great time talking with friends, customers, and all attendees. Were you unable to make the conference and still have questions? Did you attend and would you like to share a part of your experience? Feel free to comment or ask questions below. I'd love to hear from you!

-Connor Hart

Wednesday, July 06, 2016

June Answer for Roman Calendar

If you have not already done so, check the inside back cover of our 2015-16 Roman Calendar for a reproducible worksheet that asks students to engage with the mythology-oriented artwork included in the calendar.

For those completing the worksheet, here is June’s image, question, and answer.
Question: What might Juno have held in her right hand?

Answer: Congratulations to June winner Matthew Moore (Eleanor Roosevelt High School, Greenbelt, MD), who suggested that Juno could be holding a torch for a wedding procession.

Juno may also have held a royal scepter (a symbol of her status as wife of Jupiter and queen of the gods) or a pomegranate (a symbol of fertility).

Think your students know the answer to the July question on the worksheet? Tweet @BCPublishers the answer by July 25th for a chance to win five of our new buttons. We'll announce our answers, as well as the winner, at the beginning of August. Submit an answer for your class, or better yet, encourage students to participate individually.

To add your name to our mailing list for the Roman Calendar, email orders@bolchazy.com with the subject line "Roman Calendar"; be sure to include your name and mailing address in the body of the mail. Calendars are mailed annually in August.

Friday, June 03, 2016

May Answer for Roman Calendar

If you have not already done so, check the inside back cover of our 2015-16 Roman Calendar for a reproducible worksheet that asks students to engage with the mythology-oriented artwork included in the calendar.

For those completing the worksheet, here is May's image, question, and answer.
 
Question: Mercury is the patron god of a wide range of domains. How many symbols are included in this statue? With what domain is each associated?

Answer: The winged cap references Mercury's role as the messenger of the gods. The money pouch is a symbol of Mercury as god of trade and commerce (and may also allude to his status as patron god of thieves). The caduceus, the herald's sign, is another reference to his role as messenger but is not visible in the cropped image used in the calendar.


Think your students know the answer to the June question on the worksheet? Tweet @BCPublishers the answer by June 25th for a chance to win five of our new buttons. We'll announce our answers, as well as the winner, at the beginning of June. Submit an answer for your class, or better yet, encourage students to participate individually.

To add your name to our mailing list for the Roman Calendar, email orders@bolchazy.com with the subject line "Roman Calendar"; be sure to include your name and mailing address in the body of the mail. Calendars are mailed annually in August.

Tuesday, May 03, 2016

April Answer for Roman Calendar

If you have not already done so, check the inside back cover of our 2015-16 Roman Calendar for a reproducible worksheet that asks students to engage with the mythology-oriented artwork included in the calendar.

For those completing the worksheet, here is April's image, question, and answer.

Question: Many sculptures from antiquity lack some or all of their limbs, which tend to be thinner than other parts of the sculpture and therefore more susceptible to damage. What might Ceres have been holding?

Answer: Ceres may have been holding wheat or poppies as symbols of her power over the fertility of plants, or a torch as a symbol of her role in the form of marriage known as confarreatio.

Think your students know the answer to the May question on the worksheet? Tweet @BCPublishers the answer by May 25th for a chance to win five of our new buttons. We'll announce our answers, as well as the winner, at the beginning of June. Submit an answer for your class, or better yet, encourage students to participate individually.

To add your name to our mailing list for the Roman Calendar, email orders@bolchazy.com with the subject line "Roman Calendar"; be sure to include your name and mailing address in the body of the mail. Calendars are mailed annually in August.

Thursday, April 28, 2016

What Makes The Other Middle Ages an "Other" Text?

Kenneth F. Kitchell, Jr.'s new book, The Other Middle Ages introduces intermediate Latin students to selections that cover all aspects and all walks of life, from bawdy songs to to somber religious rituals and impudent parodies of the same, from short anecdotes and fables to excerpts from the bestiary tradition.

The book contains seventy-nine selections of prose and poetry, grouped thematically into categories that include "Echos of Antiquity," "The Black Death," and "Attacks on the Church," among others. While some selections have been edited for clarity and length, most are unadapted. Latin students can expect to finish one or more of these enjoyable readings in one sitting, developing their reading skills and giving them a sense of accomplishment. Notes and vocabulary have been provided to guide students accustomed to classical Latin through reading medieval texts drawn from a range of centuries and genres.

But what makes this text different from other medieval Latin texts? What makes the selections of this particular textbook "other"? We corresponded with Kitchell for his input on the matter:

"The main thing is that this is the first medieval Latin reader that I know of that was designed from the ground up to appeal to today's students. The readings are immediately accessible to today's students because it does not presuppose any previous knowledge of medieval culture or history. It is totally devoted to types of texts that other books only show in one or two examples. Thus it is also a much easier book to teach from if the teacher is not already a medievalist.

"All the readings have been classroom tested for three decades to gauge their interest level and readability. Boring texts that stirred no interest in students were tossed. Throughout this period, student input helped form the number and nature of notes, always trying to give students what they need to be able to sit down and just read the texts almost immediately after they have acquired the basics of Latin grammar and vocabulary. These texts are a great deal more accessible to intermediate students than, say, Cicero is.

"The basic thing, if I can put it this way, is that this book is a lot more fun for students and teachers alike and gives a new vehicle by which teachers and students alike can enter a type of Latin literature that is generally overlooked."

This accessible, classroom-tested, "other" medieval Latin readercan be found on our website.